SHOWGIRLS

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 22, 1995

Starring: Elizabeth Berkley, Gina Gersham

Genre: Pornography

Audience:

Rating: NC-17

Runtime: 120 minutes

Distributor: MGM/US

Director: Paul Verhoeven

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Joe Eszterhas

Address Comments To:

Content:

(NA, LLL, VVV, SSS, NNN, HoHoHo, A, D, M) Pagan worldview with elements of goddess worship; 145 obscenities, 2 blasphemies & 22 profanities; extremely violent rape & beating as well as slapping, hitting, tripping, pushing & scattering beads to cause so-called dancer to fall; simulated & explicit sexual activity including every perversion such as bondage, group sex, oral sex, etc.; extensive full female nudity throughout the movie; lesbianism & homosexuality; alcohol & drug use; and, revenge motifs

Summary:

Make no mistake, SHOWGIRLS is pornography in all its violent and perverse forms. The plot is very light weight, and the dialogue is dumb. The acting is pedestrian, and the sex is aggressive. As an insidious attack on women and love and virtue, it is a dangerous movie which needs to fail at the box-office. Boycott this film.

Review:

Make no mistake, SHOWGIRLS is pornography in all its violent and perverse forms. If you are worried about plot, character development and premise, this movie can be written off. However, if you are concerned about the images which will enter into the eye gates of millions of Americans, this film is very dangerous indeed. It tells the story of Nomi Mallone who hitchhikes into Las Vegas as a seeming innocent intent upon making her mark as a dancer. She gets a job dancing in a nude bar where she simulates sex with customers. Her passion attracts the number one showgirl in Los Vegas who gets Nomi hired by the Stardust. From there luck, grit and a mean-spirited push seem to get her to the top. However, at the end, she is exposed as a hard-hearted former prostitute.

SHOWGIRLS doesn't have one ounce of real love, compassion, tenderness, or joy. It feeds off the baser emotions and makes one question the humanity of those who made it. As an insidious attack on women, children, love, and virtue, it is a dangerous movie which needs to fail at the box office. Moral Americans need to boycott this film and tell their local theaters, malls, newspapers, radio stations, and TV stations to stop exhibiting this movie and its advertising.

In Brief: