STRAIGHT OUT OF BROOKLYN Add To My Top 10

Content -3
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 22, 1991

Starring: George T. Dom, Ann Sanders, Lawrence Gilliard, Jr. & Mark Malone.

Genre: Drama

Audience: Young people (especially
blacks) and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 95 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Company & American Playhouse Theatrical Films

Director: Matty Rich

Executive Producer:

Producer: Matty Rich

Writer: Matty Rich

Address Comments To:

Mr. Samuel Goldwyn, Jr.
Chairman
The Samuel Goldwyn Co.
10203 Santa Monica Blvd
Suite 500
Los Angeles, CA 90067
(213) 552-2255

Content:

(LLL, VV, S, M) 73 obscenities, 14 profanities, murder, and theft.

Summary:

Bigoted "white man" is the oppressor of poor blacks in STRAIGHT OUT OF BROOKLYN, an exercise in self-pity that absurdly claims the American dream is built upon the backs of oppressed blacks. Tacked on to the end of the film is a message to blacks that "we must change." Made clear throughout the film, however, is the premise that white society is the ultimate cause of such tragedy.

Review:

Bigoted "white man" is the oppressor of poor blacks in STRAIGHT OUT OF BROOKLYN, a not-so-politically correct film by 19-year-old director Matty Rich.

Living in the filthy, run-down "Red Hook" housing project, Dennis Brown is an African-American teenager who dreams of getting ahead with a college education. Unfortunately, "white man" has been "keeping him down all his life," and Dennis' father is an alcoholic who beats his wife.

When Dennis' mother realizes her life is in danger, she wants to leave but can't for a lack of financial support. To help out, Dennis and his friends rob a local drug dealer. When Dennis presents the money to his family, however, his father's anger turns to rage as he knocks his wife unconscious, putting her in critical condition at the hospital.

Walking home heartbroken for what he has done, Dennis' father is recognized by the drug dealer's henchmen, who gun him down in the Red Hook streets. Meanwhile, Dennis' mother dies in the hospital.

Touted as a "provocative, honest and dynamic film" by some Hollywood press, STRAIGHT OUT is an exercise in self-pity. Tacked on to the end of the film is a message to blacks that "we must change." Made clear throughout the film, however, is the premise that white society is the ultimate cause of such tragedy. Moreover, STRAIGHT OUT absurdly claims that our country is fundamentally racist and that the American dream is built upon the backs of oppressed blacks.

STRAIGHT OUT's only strength is that it attempts to realistically portray life on Brooklyn's streets. Unfortunately, this "plus" is also its biggest minus, with graphic depictions of murder along with rampant obscenity.

Perhaps if this film, with its technical and structural problems, were made by a white 19-year-old, it would have premiered on late-night cable rather than the silver screen.

In Brief: