THE BREAK-UP Add To My Top 10

Profane Disputes

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 02, 2006

Starring: Jennifer Aniston, Vince Vaughn, Vincent D'Onofrio, Jon Favreau, Jason Bateman, Ann-Margret, Joey Lauren Adams, and Cole Hauser

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 105 minutes

Address Comments To:

Bob Wright, Chairman/CEO
NBC Universal
Ron Meyer, President/COO
Universal Studios
Marc Shmuger, Chairman
David Linde, Co-Chairman
Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(PaPa, C, B, Ho, LLL, V, SS, NN, A, D, MM) Strong pagan worldview with a minor redemptive message rebuking selfishness and egotism, plus some homosexual references and implications for comic effect; at least 48 mostly light obscenities (including one "f" word), 23 strong profanities and six light exclamatory profanities; man subdues another man with martial arts punches and judo in a comic scene, plus intense arguing and people play violent video games but the violence is not usually shown overtly or strongly; unmarried couple lives together, voyeurism and exhibitionism, some discussion of sexuality, woman walks naked in front of ex-boyfriend in scheme to make him jealous, men play strip poker with women and later viewers see women's naked backs from behind while man watches from front, and some homosexual references, but nothing really graphic; rear female nudity as woman walks naked in front of ex-boyfriend in the condo they still share, female cleavage when people start to play strip poker, upper male nudity, and naked female backs shown in a couple scenes; alcohol use; brief smoking; and, reference to feng shui, self-centeredness rebuked, implied gambling, rude behavior, and couple schemes against one another.

Summary:

THE BREAK-UP stars Jennifer Aniston and Vince Vaughn as Brooke and Gary, two adults living together in the Windy City, Chicago. A fierce argument results in a tumultuous break-up, which leads to comical complications. When the movie doesn't include sexual references or lots of foul language, it is somewhat funny, but not enough to recommend it.

Review:

THE BREAK-UP has some problems with character development and its basic worldview, which is rather profane, but the movie almost succeeds when it doesn't resort to foul language or crude humor.

The movie stars Jennifer Aniston and Vince Vaughn as Brooke and Gary, two adults living together in the Windy City, Chicago. Gary has a sense of humor which he uses in his job as tour guide for a company he runs with his two brothers. Brooke manages an art gallery for a quirky, older female artist.

A dinner engagement with their respective families in their condo ends in a fierce argument when Gary contributes nothing to the meal and refuses to help with the dishes. To get his attention, Brooke calls Gary a name and angrily breaks up with him.

For the rest of the movie, Brooke tries various schemes to win back this self-centered, immature man. Gary is just too angry and too caught up with his own childish concerns to notice what she's doing, until it's almost too late.

The man is clearly the bad guy in this story, which makes one wonder why the woman wants to get back with him. When the story doesn't include sexual references or foul language, the movie is quite funny. There is little redemptive about the story's central relationship, however, although the movie clearly says that Gary needs to treat Brooke better and Brooke needs to communicate with Gary better. Because of this, and the movie's strong foul language, including many strong profanities, MOVIEGUIDEĀ® rates THE BREAK-UP as excessive. The movie also includes brief nudity, implied nudity and some homosexual innuendoes. Overall, the dominant worldview is a pagan one, without godly virtue.

In Brief:

THE BREAK-UP stars Jennifer Aniston and Vince Vaughn as Brooke and Gary, two adults living together in Chicago. Gary has a sense of humor which he uses as tour guide for a company he runs with his two brothers. Brooke manages an art gallery for a quirky, older female artist. A dinner engagement with their families in their condo ends in a fierce argument when Gary contributes nothing to the meal and refuses to help with the dishes. To get his attention, Brooke angrily breaks up with Gary. For the rest of the movie, Brooke tries various schemes to win back this self-centered, immature man.

The man is clearly the bad guy in this story, which makes one wonder why the woman wants to get back with him. When the movie doesn't include sexual references or foul language, it is somewhat funny. There is little redemptive about the story's central relationship, though the movie clearly says that Gary needs to treat Brooke better and Brooke needs to communicate with Gary better. Because of this, and the movie's strong foul language, including many strong profanities, MOVIEGUIDEĀ® rates THE BREAK-UP as excessive.