S.W.A.T.

Quality: Content: -1 "CAUTION"
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

Content:

(H, B, LL, VV, A, D, M) Humanist worldview portraying “might rules,” but secondary moral truths espoused (evil does not win out in the end, loyalty, teamwork, family, etc.); moderate language with about 15 obscenities and four strong profanities; intense action violence with murder, shooting, cutting with knife, fighting, etc.; no sex, but some light innuendo; no nudity; some portrayals of drinking and smoking; and, lying, gambling, and deception.
GENRE: Police Thriller
H
B
LL
VV
A
D
M

Summary:

In SWAT, a S.W.A.T. team must move an evil French drug lord to a secure prison, but the bad guy is offering $100 million to any who will free him. With some foul language and a lot of action violence, S.W.A.T. is nonetheless an enjoyable, well-written movie full of non-stop police action.

Review:

S.W.A.T. is a basic action/thriller that delivers a good story, decent characters, and a fun time. It is marred by foul language, but not overly so for a cop picture. There is no nudity or sex. There are sexual references, but no sex scenes. And, there is plenty of action violence and explosions to accent the shooting, running, and fast driving.
The basic story is that Jim Street (Colin Farrell) is a S.W.A.T. officer (Special Weapons and Tactics) in Los Angeles who is temporarily kicked off S.W.A.T. because of a stunt his partner pulled in shooting a bank robber without authorization. Unknown to him, his partner has decided to become a villain. With S.W.A.T. now having a black eye in the press, old-timer Hondo (Samuel L. Jackson) is brought back from another precinct to build a new team and fix the problems. Along with training two new members, he decides to give Street a chance.
Soon, after the normal friction, they are a well-trained team taking on adventure and evil-doers. (Amazingly enough, they don’t kill every time!)
Meanwhile, a French drug lord has come to L.A. to even a score. In a fluke situation, he is caught by a traffic cop. After one aborted escape (complete with lots of shooting), while being placed in custody, he shouts out to the video crews that he will give one-hundred million dollars to whoever frees him.
Hondo and Street’s S.W.A.T. team is tasked with moving him from the local prison to a more secure location in the desert. Unfortunately, every nasty bad guy with a machine gun wants to cash in on the money, as well as Street’s ex-partner.
S.W.A.T. is well made, fairly well acted, and, though some of the characters are a little wooden/stereotypical, it is fun to watch Colin Farrell and Samul L. Jackson on screen. S.W.A.T. espouses loyalty, teamwork, family, and, for the most part, following the law (though Hondo s t r e t c h e s it when he needs), but there is enough light sexual innuendo and course jesting to keep it a movie for older teenagers and adults.
S.W.A.T. could be compared to a western of the early 60s. One would expect gunplay and some rough talk. A mature Christian could perhaps enjoy this film without feeling slimed when he or she walks out of the theater.
Please address your comments to:
Amy Pascal, Chairman
Columbia Pictures
John Calley, Chairman/CEO
Sony Pictures Entertainment
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/
SUMMARY: In SWAT, a S.W.A.T. team must move an evil French drug lord to a secure prison, but the bad guy is offering $100 million to any who will free him. With some foul language and a lot of action violence, S.W.A.T. is nonetheless an enjoyable, well-written movie full of non-stop police action.

In Brief: