TRASH

"Saved from Poverty and Despair"

Quality:
Content: -2 Discretion advised for adults.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

TRASH is a Brazilian-American production. Martin Sheen plays a disillusioned, cynical American priest serving people in a poor section of Rio de Janeiro who pick food and items out of a landfill. A poor teenage boy, Rafael, finds a wallet with money, plus a locker key and a mysterious code. As Rafael and two friends find the locker to which the key belongs, a corrupt official sends the police looking for the wallet. The locker contains clues to the other part of the code. Put together, the two parts lead to the corrupt official’s bookkeeping accounts and 16 million Brazilian dollars stolen from him.

TRASH tells an exciting, moving story but takes place in a gritty, corrupt world. The teenage boys are rogues, but they have good qualities despite their poverty-stricken, delinquent lifestyle. Also, the priest likes his whiskey and is disillusioned and cynical. However, there’s a strong Christian faith underlying all this, which leads to an uplifting ending. That said, extreme caution is advised because of foul language, violence and a slightly socialist interpretation of Christian sharing and social activism.

Content:

(CC, BB, Ab, So, PC, LLL, VV, N, A, D, M) Strong Christian, moral worldview promoting doing the right thing in a Roman Catholic context but set in a gritty, corrupt world, three poor teenage boys are the heroes, but they are no angels though they do have faith and good qualities of kindness, Catholic priest is disillusioned and cynical but his female assistant is not, and there is a slightly socialist, collectivist, politically correct attitude concerning “the people” and the ideas of Christian sharing and rising up together against social corruption in favor of “social justice”; about 37 obscenities (about five or so “f” words), three strong profanities and one light profanity; strong violence with some blood includes bloodied and wounded man’s arms are strung up indicating he’s been tortured about some money, and his dead body is later dumped in a trash sack, teenage boy is given a “rough ride” in a police car and in trunk of police car, and his face and arms are bloodied/wounded, police officers disobey evil detective’s orders to kill teenage boy and they say let him do his own dirty work before driving away, teenage boy threatens bad guy with pistol, police on a corrupt mission chase and fire guns at boys, two visits to a graveyard, teenage boys and younger girl beat up violent villain to escape his clutches; no sex, but woman receives catcalls from prisoners in cells as she walks down a corridor; upper male nudity; alcohol use; smoking but no drugs; and, corrupt official has taken bribes, police corruption, stealing.

More Detail:

TRASH is a Brazilian-American co-production about three poor teenage boys who go on a dangerous adventure searching for millions of dollars in corrupt bribe money that a corrupt official wants returned to him. TRASH has a Christian worldview as the story also involves an American priest and his English-speaking assistant, but it’s set in a gritty world containing foul language and violence, so extreme caution is advised.

Martin Sheen plays a disillusioned, cynical American priest serving poor people in a poor section of Rio de Janeiro who pick food and other unwanted items out of a local landfill. One day, a poor teenage boy, Rafael, finds a wallet with some money, plus a locker key and part of a mysterious code. As Rafael and two friends find the locker to which the key belongs, a corrupt official sends the police looking for the wallet. The locker contains clues to another part of the code. When put together, the two parts of the code lead to the corrupt official’s bookkeeping accounts, and 16 million Brazilian dollars stolen from him.

TRASH tells an exciting, moving story but takes place in a gritty, corrupt world. The three teenage boys are rogues, but they do have some good qualities despite their poverty-stricken, delinquent lifestyle. Also, the priest as played by Martin Sheen likes his whiskey and is disillusioned and cynical. However, there’s a strong Christian faith underlying all this, which leads to an uplifting ending. That said, extreme caution is advised because of strong foul language, violence and a slightly socialist, collectivist interpretation of Christian sharing and social activism. The ending, for example, contains a call to “the people” to rise up together and protest the social corruption revealed by the story of the three boys.

Ultimately, however, the story of the three boys is an uplifting one that will leave viewers with an inspiring sense of hope. At bottom, they have a simple faith that helps them find some grace from God and saves them from a life of poverty and despair. A positive twist during the climactic confrontation with a corrupt police detective leads to this positive ending. Even the disillusioned priest is amazed by what happens.

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