Another Earth Add To My Top 10

Second Chances Aren’t Enough

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 22, 2011

Starring: William Mapother, Brit Marling, Matthew-Lee Erlbach, DJ Flava, Megan Lennon,

Genre: Science Fiction

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 92 minutes

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman/CEO, News Corp.
Chase Carey, President/COO, News Corp.
Stephen Gilula, President/COO
Nancy Utley, President/COO, Fox Searchlight Pictures
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd., Bldg. 38
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000; Fax: (310) 369-2359
Website: www.foxsearchlight.com

Content:

(RoRo, FRFR, BB, C, P, L, VVV, SS, NN, AA, DD, MM) Strong Romantic, emotions-driven worldview, with strong nominalist undercurrents, but the focus is on making a strong moral, slightly redemptive statement about the importance of facing one’s innermost fears and one’s past in order to seek forgiveness and redemption, plus a patriotic depiction of the U.S. as the foremost world power; two or three obscenities (including/plus sexual innuendos on radio and “f” word graffiti on bathroom wall); very shocking and graphic car crash, girl attempts suicide by self-inflicted hypothermia, man chokes woman in anger; depicted fornication with clothes, man takes off woman’s pants, teenage girl kisses guy sensually at high school party, prostitute gets out of car; full back female nudity in half light, partial nudity and scenes of girl in underwear; high school teenagers drink at party, man abuses alcohol to cope with loss of family; self-medication of drugs and random use of marijuana in park; and, lying, deception, fraud.

Summary:

ANOTHER EARTH traces the journey of an aspiring astrophysicist as she seeks forgiveness from a Yale composer and musician for the accidental murder of his pregnant wife and youthful son in a brutal car crash she caused by driving drunk as a high school senior the night a duplicate Earth appeared in the night sky. The movie is intensely character-driven and tries to show that self-sacrifice ultimately triumphs over despair, but it fails to develop the underlying Christian, spiritual elements in its story and contains some lewd content.

Review:

ANOTHER EARTH is a provocative and character-driven art movie that proves how a limited production budget can be stretched a long way with an innovative concept and memorable acting. Building on the classic science fiction quest for life beyond our planet, it offers an interesting spin: What if there was not only life elsewhere, but also another Earth? Moreover, what if, on the doppleganger planet, there was another me? And, if offered the chance to meet oneself, what would one say?

Despite the intriguing questions, the movie leaves the audience wishing that more were left unsaid and that the writers didn’t feel the need to explain away every metaphor and philosophical reference. From a Christian perspective, the movie’s worldview ultimately fails when it implies that forgiveness lies in the hands of men and must be earned at all cost, rather than freely granted. Thus, in the protagonist’s ultimate quest for truth and self-realization, neither God nor religion makes an appearance.

Rhoda Williams, a promising astrophysicist admitted to the prestigious MIT, gets behind the wheel drunk after a high school party and is distracted by the appearance of another Earth in the night sky – literally, a bright blue replica of our own planet. The sight causes her to crash brutally into another car, killing the pregnant wife and unborn son of Yale musician John Burroughs, who lapses into a coma.

Four years later, Rhoda is released from prison, and John awakes from the coma. Haunted by the memory of her spotted past, Rhoda decides that the only way forward is to repent and seek the forgiveness of John in person. She shows up at his idyllic Massachusetts country home, intent on revealing her identity. (John has no idea who’s responsible for his wife and son’s death because Rhoda was a minor at the time of the crash.)

Face to face with John for the first time since the night Earth 2 appeared four years ago, fear gets the better of Rhoda. In a moment of weakness, she feigns to represent a local maid service offering a free, trial house cleaning. Rhoda’s deception initiates an unlikely friendship that blossoms into an uneasy love story, wherein Rhoda and John respectively attempt to escape their past and, ironically, “find” themselves.

As all this continues, Rhoda submits an essay to win a trip aboard the shuttle to Earth 2, a world symbolizing chances. Here on Earth 1, trapped in a web of deceit but fueled by good intentions, Rhoda ultimately learns through her weekly visits to John’s home that escape is not the answer. She also realizes forgiveness can only come from fully facing and acknowledging one’s sins. Her own journey of self-discovery is mirrored by Earth 1’s quest to understand the significance of the doppleganger planet that seems to loom ever closer. If there is another earth, does that mean there could be another me? If so, has he or she made the same choices? Is it possible that up there, beyond the scope of our earthly senses, there’s another world full of opportunities and the chance for a fresh start? Questions of self-identity and self-realization permeate this fascinating Neo-Platonic work of art, which seeks to show that self-sacrifice ultimately triumphs over despair.

Sadly, it’s precisely in Rhoda’s moment of self-realization that the movie’s limits also become clear. ANOTHER EARTH fails to provide a theologically sound answer to the question, “Is there a way for me to start over and transcend my past?” This is because Rhoda and John strive to fill the voids in their respective lives with an empty, tenuous sexual relationship, or by running away to another world, as far away from their problems as they physically can go. Rather than face the truth that they are broken human beings like everyone else, Rhoda and John momentarily find solace in their pleasant fantasy. While the illusion is, in the end, debunked, the movie doesn’t offer a viable and theologically sound alternative.

In the end, ANOTHER EARTH does not fully pay off the deeply philosophical questions it tries to raise. Also, ANOTHER EARTH is not a movie for children, but requires extreme caution because of its Romantic worldview, nominalistic elements, lewd content, and a very violent car crash. That said, mature media-wise viewers might find ANOTHER EARTH interesting, even though they probably will recognize its failings. Viewers cannot help but be touched by both the fresh, simple cinematography and inspiring performances of the two stars, especially Brit Marling, whose transparency and ingenuity shine through in spite of the movie’s limitations.

In Brief:

In the science fiction drama ANOTHER EARTH, Rhoda Williams, a promising astrophysicist admitted to the prestigious MIT, gets behind the wheel drunk after a high school party and is distracted by the appearance of another Earth in the night sky – literally, a bright blue replica of our own planet. The sight causes her to crash brutally into another car, killing the pregnant wife and unborn son of Yale musician John Burroughs, who lapses into a coma. Four years later, Rhoda is released from prison, and John awakes from the coma. Haunted by the memory of her spotted past, Rhoda tries to make amends, but she can’t yet confess the truth to John as they begin a budding love affair.

ANOTHER EARTH goes a long way with a low budget and asks a number of provocative philosophical questions. The fresh, simple cinematography and inspiring performance by Brit Marling as Rhoda are good, but the movie fails to take overt advantage of the Christian, religious implications of its story of attempted redemption. ANOTHER EARTH also has a Romantic worldview, some lewd moments and a very violent car crash, so extreme caution is advised.

HEADLINE: ** Second Chances Aren’t Enough **

Title: ANOTHER EARTH

Quality: * * * Acceptability: -2

SUBTITLES: None

WARNING CODES:

Language: L

Violence: VVV

Sex: SS

Nudity: NN

RATING: PG-13

RELEASE: July 22, 2011

TIME: 92 minutes

STARRING: William Mapother, Brit Marling, Matthew-Lee Erlbach, DJ Flava, Megan Lennon,

DIRECTOR: Mike Cahill

PRODUCERS: Hunter Gray, Mike Cahill, Brit Marling, Nick Shumaker

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: Tyler Brodie, Paul Mezey

WRITERS: Mike Cahill and Brit Marling

BASED ON THE NOVEL/PLAY BY: N/A

DISTRIBUTOR: Fox Searchlight Pictures/News Corp.

CONTENT: (RoRo, FRFR, BB, C, P, L, VVV, SS, NN, AA, DD, MM) Strong Romantic, emotions-driven worldview, with strong nominalist undercurrents, but the focus is on making a strong moral, slightly redemptive statement about the importance of facing one’s innermost fears and one’s past in order to seek forgiveness and redemption, plus a patriotic depiction of the U.S. as the foremost world power; two or three obscenities (including/plus sexual innuendos on radio and “f” word graffiti on bathroom wall); very shocking and graphic car crash, girl attempts suicide by self-inflicted hypothermia, man chokes woman in anger; depicted fornication with clothes, man takes off woman’s pants, teenage girl kisses guy sensually at high school party, prostitute gets out of car; full back female nudity in half light, partial nudity and scenes of girl in underwear; high school teenagers drink at party, man abuses alcohol to cope with loss of family; self-medication of drugs and random use of marijuana in park; and, lying, deception, fraud.

GENRE: Science Fiction

INTENDED AUDIENCE: Older teenagers and adults

REVIEWER: Sarah-Jane Murray

REVIEW: ANOTHER EARTH is a provocative and character-driven art movie that proves how a limited production budget can be stretched a long way with an innovative concept and memorable acting. Building on the classic science fiction quest for life beyond our planet, it offers an interesting spin: What if there was not only life elsewhere, but also another Earth? Moreover, what if, on the doppleganger planet, there was another me? And, if offered the chance to meet oneself, what would one say?

Despite the intriguing questions, the movie leaves the audience wishing that more were left unsaid and that the writers didn’t feel the need to explain away every metaphor and philosophical reference. From a Christian perspective, the movie’s worldview ultimately fails when it implies that forgiveness lies in the hands of men and must be earned at all cost, rather than freely granted. Thus, in the protagonist’s ultimate quest for truth and self-realization, neither God nor religion makes an appearance.

Rhoda Williams, a promising astrophysicist admitted to the prestigious MIT, gets behind the wheel drunk after a high school party and is distracted by the appearance of another Earth in the night sky – literally, a bright blue replica of our own planet. The sight causes her to crash brutally into another car, killing the pregnant wife and unborn son of Yale musician John Burroughs, who lapses into a coma.

Four years later, Rhoda is released from prison, and John awakes from the coma. Haunted by the memory of her spotted past, Rhoda decides that the only way forward is to repent and seek the forgiveness of John in person. She shows up at his idyllic Massachusetts country home, intent on revealing her identity. (John has no idea who’s responsible for his wife and son’s death because Rhoda was a minor at the time of the crash.)

Face to face with John for the first time since the night Earth 2 appeared four years ago, fear gets the better of Rhoda. In a moment of weakness, she feigns to represent a local maid service offering a free, trial house cleaning. Rhoda’s deception initiates an unlikely friendship that blossoms into an uneasy love story, wherein Rhoda and John respectively attempt to escape their past and, ironically, “find” themselves.

As all this continues, Rhoda submits an essay to win a trip aboard the shuttle to Earth 2, a world symbolizing chances. Here on Earth 1, trapped in a web of deceit but fueled by good intentions, Rhoda ultimately learns through her weekly visits to John’s home that escape is not the answer. She also realizes forgiveness can only come from fully facing and acknowledging one’s sins. Her own journey of self-discovery is mirrored by Earth 1’s quest to understand the significance of the doppleganger planet that seems to loom ever closer. If there is another earth, does that mean there could be another me? If so, has he or she made the same choices? Is it possible that up there, beyond the scope of our earthly senses, there’s another world full of opportunities and the chance for a fresh start? Questions of self-identity and self-realization permeate this fascinating Neo-Platonic work of art, which seeks to show that self-sacrifice ultimately triumphs over despair.

Sadly, it’s precisely in Rhoda’s moment of self-realization that the movie’s limits also become clear. ANOTHER EARTH fails to provide a theologically sound answer to the question, “Is there a way for me to start over and transcend my past?” This is because Rhoda and John strive to fill the voids in their respective lives with an empty, tenuous sexual relationship, or by running away to another world, as far away from their problems as they physically can go. Rather than face the truth that they are broken human beings like everyone else, Rhoda and John momentarily find solace in their pleasant fantasy. While the illusion is, in the end, debunked, the movie doesn’t offer a viable and theologically sound alternative.

In the end, ANOTHER EARTH does not fully pay off the deeply philosophical questions it tries to raise. Also, ANOTHER EARTH is not a movie for children, but requires extreme caution because of its Romantic worldview, nominalistic elements, lewd content, and a very violent car crash. That said, mature media-wise viewers might find ANOTHER EARTH interesting, even though they probably will recognize its failings. Viewers cannot help but be touched by both the fresh, simple cinematography and inspiring performances of the two stars, especially Brit Marling, whose transparency and ingenuity shine through in spite of the movie’s limitations.

Please address your comments to:

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman/CEO, News Corp.

Chase Carey, President/COO, News Corp.

Stephen Gilula, President/COO

Nancy Utley, President/COO, Fox Searchlight Pictures

20th Century Fox Film Corp.

10201 West Pico Blvd., Bldg. 38

Los Angeles, CA 90035

Phone: (310) 369-1000; Fax: (310) 369-2359

Website: www.foxsearchlight.com

SUMMARY: ANOTHER EARTH traces the journey of an aspiring astrophysicist as she seeks forgiveness from a Yale composer and musician for the accidental murder of his pregnant wife and youthful son in a brutal car crash she caused by driving drunk as a high school senior the night a duplicate Earth appeared in the night sky. The movie is intensely character-driven and tries to show that self-sacrifice ultimately triumphs over despair, but it fails to develop the underlying Christian, spiritual elements in its story and contains some lewd content.

IN BRIEF:

In the science fiction drama ANOTHER EARTH, Rhoda Williams, a promising astrophysicist admitted to the prestigious MIT, gets behind the wheel drunk after a high school party and is distracted by the appearance of another Earth in the night sky – literally, a bright blue replica of our own planet. The sight causes her to crash brutally into another car, killing the pregnant wife and unborn son of Yale musician John Burroughs, who lapses into a coma. Four years later, Rhoda is released from prison, and John awakes from the coma. Haunted by the memory of her spotted past, Rhoda tries to make amends, but she can’t yet confess the truth to John as they begin a budding love affair.

ANOTHER EARTH goes a long way with a low budget and asks a number of provocative philosophical questions. The fresh, simple cinematography and inspiring performance by Brit Marling as Rhoda are good, but the movie fails to take overt advantage of the Christian, religious implications of its story of attempted redemption. ANOTHER EARTH also has a Romantic worldview, some lewd moments and a very violent car crash, so extreme caution is advised.