THE JUROR

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 02, 1996

Starring: Demi Moore, Alec Baldwin

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 120 minutes

Distributor: Columbia Pictures

Director: Brian Gibson

Executive Producer:

Producer: Irwin Winkler & Rob Cowan

Writer: Ted Tally & George Dawes Green

Address Comments To:

Content:

(Pa, LLL, VV, SS, NN) Pagan worldview; 46 obscenities, 4 profanities & 21 vulgarities; 10 killings mostly from shootings, but also car bombing & forced drug overdose; depicted sex; and, female nudity.

Summary:

Demi Moore is THE JUROR who volunteers for duty, only to be harassed and stalked by a psychopathic hitman who wants her to say not guilty. Foul language, violence and unimpressive performances make this movie guilty of mediocrity and silliness.

Review:

Very few people look forward to jury duty. Annie Laird, THE JUROR played by Demi Moore, does. She is an artist and single mom who agrees to be a juror because she "needs a little excitement in her life." Annie very quickly regrets her decision when it becomes apparent she must do the bidding of a twisted, psychopathic mob hitman, "The Teacher" played by Alec Baldwin, or lose her loved ones. Annie's assignment is to get an acquittal for the mob boss standing trial, and she performs very well under pressure. Not only is she able to convince the other eleven jurors to vote "not guilty," she also finds a way to outsmart the Teacher and turns the mob boss against the Teacher. The Teacher and the mob boss shoot it out, and the Teacher flies to Guatemala City with her son. Annie follows leading up to a fatal climax.

THE JUROR is a high-gloss package with beautiful, expensive stars which covers up a silly, pointless movie. The action is violently sadistic, and there is nothing redeeming about the film. Do we really need to see another psychopathic hitman? Demi Moore does not disrobe for this film, but her performance, both scrappy and sensitive, is nothing new. There is no stretch for either actor, and no intrigue for the viewer. There are greater films thrillers and greater court room dramas. This movie is guilty of mediocrity and silliness.

In Brief: