THE MATADOR Add To My Top 10

Seduced by the Dark Side

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 23, 2005

Starring: Pierce Brosnan, Greg Kinnear, Hope Davis, Philip Baker Hall, Dylan Baker, and Adam Scott

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 96 minutes

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
Miramax Films
375 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10013
Phone: (323) 822-4100 and (212) 941-3800
Fax: (212) 941-3846
Website: www.miramax.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, C, LLL, V, SS, NN, AA, D, MMM) Very strong pagan worldview where a businessman helps a hitman retire by helping him commit one more assassination, with some Christian references implying guilt, possible repentance and possible redemption, including implications (which may be biblical) that the average person is fascinated by violence and attracted to it because that’s sinful human nature; 54 mostly strong obscenities, four strong obscenities, seven light profanities, and one obscene gesture; many references to being a professional hitman and man tries to shoot a couple people and can’t, plus implied successful assassinations and arson; two scenes of depicted fornication with prostitutes, talk about sex, and man leers at high school girls and talks in general terms about having no scruples in seducing them; brief upper and rear female nudity, and upper and rear male nudity; scenes of alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking; and, lying, rude behavior, businessman helps hitman assassinate one person trying to assassinate hitman, people are intrigued and enthralled by hitman’s violent job, and moral relativism.

Summary:

THE MATADOR is a comedy about a middle-aged hitman who tries to impress a young businessman when they encounter one another in a bar in Mexico City, leading to comical situations. THE MATADOR is funny and sharply written, but it is filled with plenty of very strong foul language, a couple very strong sex scenes and moral relativism.

Review:

THE MATADOR is a comedy about a middle-aged hitman who tries to impress a young businessman when they encounter one another in a bar in Mexico City. Pierce Brosnan plays the hitman, Julian, who strikes up a conversation with Danny Wright (played by Greg Kinnear), who's trying to land a big business deal with the Mexican government. Drunk, lonely and bitter, Julian makes a terrible faux pas while talking to Danny, who angrily stalks off.

The next morning, Julian apologizes profusely to Danny, and the two men soon become tourist buddies. Danny is clearly fascinated by Julian's life, and Julian impresses him further by showing him how easy it is to kill someone and get away with it.

The hitman's secret, however, is that he's no longer able to carry out his murders because the guilt has become too much and his nerves are shot. This leads to a couple misadventures that not only morally implicate the businessman but eventually the businessman's wife as well.

THE MATADOR is funny and sharply written, and well acted. It is filled, however, with plenty of very strong foul language and very strong sex scenes between the hitman and a couple prostitutes he visits. Booze and sex have obviously become the primary two methods that Julian uses to assuage his guilt and calm his nerves. Cementing this movie's abhorrent status is the fact that the businessman helps the hitman assassinate someone. The victim is a killer himself, but that does not morally excuse either the hitman or the businessman.

That said, one of the movie's insights is quite profound. The movie shows how average people can be easily seduced by the violent lifestyle of violent men. The businessman and his wife are clearly fascinated by the hitman’s violent crimes. When he talks about his job, they are enthralled. Thus, the movie strongly implies the biblical truth that no human being is truly good – “their feet are swift to shed blood. . . and the way of peace they do not know (Rom. 3:15, 17 and Isaiah 59:7.8).” This truth applies to every one of us on earth, both saint and unrepentant sinner.

In Brief:

THE MATADOR is a comedy about a middle-aged hitman who tries to impress a young businessman when they meet in a bar in Mexico City. Pierce Brosnan plays the hitman, Julian, who strikes up a conversation with Danny Wright (played by Greg Kinnear), who's trying to land a big business deal. The two men soon become tourist buddies. Julian's life clearly fascinates Danny, and Julian impresses him further by showing him how easy it is to kill someone and get away with it. Julian's secret, however, is that he's no longer able to carry out his murders because the guilt has become too much and his nerves are shot. This leads to a couple misadventures that morally implicate the businessman and even his wife.

THE MATADOR is funny and sharply written, but it is filled with plenty of very strong foul language and very strong sex scenes between the hitman and a couple prostitutes he visits. Cementing this movie's abhorrent status is the fact that the businessman helps the hitman assassinate someone. The movie points out that the victim is a killer himself, but that evil excuse is an example of moral relativism.