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LAND

"Let Other People Help You"

Quality:
Content: -2 Discretion advised for adults.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

LAND opens on a fortysomething woman named Edee talking to her therapist. Edee says she’s tired of everyone wanting her to feel better. Cut to Edee on the street and then in her vehicle. She appears to be venturing into the Rocky Mountains. Edee strives to live alone, completely off the grid, but her city roots and inexperience are a disadvantage. It’s not until she almost dies, that Edee starts to get the hang of her new lifestyle and face the painful experiences haunting her.

LAND is a solid entertainment. Robin Wright does a great job playing the lead character as well as directing the movie. LAND has a strong moral worldview. At first, the protagonist tries to escape her grief in a humanist, do-it-yourself manner. Ultimately, however, she learns that escaping to the wilderness is a futile gesture unless she also processes her pain. Mainly, though, LAND stresses the value of friendship, family, helping other people, and learning new things. MOVIEGUIDE® advises strong caution for older children because of some foul language, violence and light Non-Christian, environmentalist elements in LAND.

Content:

(BB, H, E, Pa, FR, L, VV, S, N, A, M):

Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:
Strong moral worldview ultimately stresses pro-life elements of choosing life even when things look bleak and stresses the value of friendship, family and learning new things, but the protagonist at first looks for an escape from her grief that plays on humanist characteristics of a do-it-yourself nature, though eventually she learns that her running into a drastically different lifestyle was futile unless she processes her pain, subtle environmentalist elements that mainly capture the beauty of Creation but with one song lyric that protagonist sings for fun that references Mother Nature, and a quick scene where a character is on his deathbed and his friends perform a Native American ritual

Foul Language:
Two obscenities and three OMG profanities

Violence:
Woman has blisters on her hands, woman pleads with female protagonist not to hurt herself, black bear looms near a woman but doesn’t harm her, black bear ransacks through woman’s belongings, woman falls to the floor unconscious, man and woman hunt wildlife with guns and trim their catches with knifes and there’s occasionally some depicted blood, woman puts a gun to her chin but doesn’t pull the trigger, and man mentions a car accident that ended in fatalities

Sex:
Vaguely implied marital sex when protagonist remembers in one scene a moment of closeness with her husband, who appears to be on lying top of her, but nothing graphic is shown or can be seen

Nudity:
No explicit nudity depicted, but woman’s bare back shown when she receives medical attention and again when she washes herself, and implied nudity as a woman bathes

Alcohol Use:
No alcohol use, but a mention of alcoholism

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
No smoking or drugs, but a nurse administers an IV; and,

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Some passive aggressive rudeness, and a distressed woman calls herself names.

More Detail:

LAND follows a middle-aged woman who ventures to live off the land in the Rocky Mountains, with virtually no experience in wildlife, who eventually finds that her stubbornness is both an asset and a drawback. LAND is a solid entertainment, with good acting and directing from Robin Wright, and has a strong moral worldview, but the movie also contains some foul language, violence and light pagan, environmentalist elements.

LAND begins with Edee (Robin Wright of HOUSE OF CARDS), a forty or fiftysomething woman, as she speaks to a therapist. Edee tells that she’s tired of everyone wanting her feel better. Cut to Edee on the street and shortly thereafter her vehicle. She appears to be venturing into the wilderness, the Rocky Mountains to be exact.

Once in the wild, Edee tells the man who helped her find her living quarters, a rundown cabin, that she doesn’t want her vehicle any longer and wants to be on her own, even though he advises against it. Edee takes to her new lifestyle, with some hiccups, however. For instance, cutting wood isn’t as easy as she expected. Neither is staying warm as the season grows colder.

Occasionally, Edee sees two people, a man and a boy. First, she sees them in a clearing close to her home. Later, she recalls a moment of closeness with the man while falling asleep. Viewers might recognize her wedding ring in these frames. Edee also recalls a conversation with a woman named Emma who encourages her not to harm herself.

What is all this about? Is Edee running or grieving out in the middle of nowhere on purpose?

Eventually, Edee’s poor personal care catches up to her in the wintertime. She falls unconscious to the floor while venturing outside. Thankfully for Edee, an outdoorsman named Miguel and a nurse, Alawa, come to her rescue. They bring her back to mobility and give her the necessary nutrients she needs to heal. The two newcomers into Edee’s story don’t ask questions about her way of life, though they’re clearly curious. Edee asserts that she’s fine on her own and won’t cause any trouble.

Despite her protestations, Miguel returns to show her the ropes of the land she now calls home. Will this land bring Edee the peace she desires?

LAND has a solid entertainment value for the viewers who like wilderness dramas like CALL OF THE WILD, NOMADLAND and INTO THE WILD. As Edee, Robin Wright does a great job performing the highs and lows of her character as well as directing the movie. LAND’s score is ethereal and pulsing alongside onscreen scenes of beautiful greenery and wild animals. Viewers will find themselves rooting for the wellbeing of Wright’s character.

LAND has a strong moral worldview. At first, the protagonist looks for an escape from her grief that plays on humanist characteristics of a do-it-yourself nature, but ultimately, she learns that her running into a drastically different lifestyle was futile unless she processes her pain. There are subtle environmentalist elements that capture the beauty of Creation and includes a song lyric referring to Mother Nature that the protagonist sings for fun. Also, there’s a brief scene where a man is on his deathbed and his friends perform a Native American pagan ritual. Mainly, though, LAND stresses the value of friendship, family, helping other people, and learning new things. MOVIEGUIDE® advises strong caution for older children because of some foul language, violence and the Non-Christian elements in LAND.