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HOT FUZZ

"Spoofing Red Shire England"

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What You Need To Know:

HOT FUZZ is an English comedy. Nicholas Angel is such a good cop that he makes all the other cops in London look really bad. So, his superiors transfer him to the safest village in England, the sleepy, rustic town of Sandford. Once there, Angel is partnered with Danny Butterman, the chubby son of the police chief, who has a passion for Hollywood cop movies. Danny longs to experience the gunfights and car chases he sees in movies. Angel dismisses Danny’s childish fantasies, but, when a series of grisly accidents rocks the village, Angel becomes convinced there’s a dangerous mass murderer on the loose. Danny’s dreams of high-octane police action soon become a reality.

The first half or so of HOT FUZZ is a hilarious, genial spoof of police thrillers and village life in England. Then, however, the movie’s R-rated gruesome violence and strong foul language kick in. The story also descends into a politically correct attack on conservative tradition in English villages. Even the local Christian vicar is unmasked as a villain who spouts a blasphemy at one point. The negative content eventually becomes too excessive, unpalatable and silly.

Content:

(HH, PCPC, ABAB, B, Pa, LLL, VVV, S, AA, M) Strong humanist, politically correct worldview attacking conservative village life in England where the comic hero says that he’s agnostic about whether God exists and the local Christian vicar is unmasked as a villain and spouts a blasphemy, plus some moral elements stressing law and order but which are weakened by the movie’s humanist worldview (moralism divorced from God, especially when stressing law and order, can become fascism) and villains belong to a secret cult of community worshippers who murder to protect village’s clean status; 36 obscenities (about half or more are “f” words), one strong profanity, one strong profanity that’s a blasphemy, and five light profanities; lots of action violence, some comic violence and some extreme, gruesome violence such as decapitations, large stone gruesomely smashes man’s head, explosions, gunfights, pratfalls, images of murdered bodies and two heads without bodies, and woman stabbed with garden shears; no sex scenes but an adulterous affair is part of the plot and female police officer says she’s been “around the station” a few times; no nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; no smoking; and, secret conservative cult deviously manipulates village and its status and police officials transfer officer who makes them look too bad because he’s so good.

More Detail:

HOT FUZZ is an action-packed English comedy that is very funny until its R-rated content kicks in about halfway through the narrative.

Nicholas Angel is such a good cop that he makes all the other cops in London look really bad. So, his superiors transfer him to the safest village in England, the sleepy, rustic town of Sandford.

Once there, Angel is partnered with Danny Butterman, the chubby son of the police chief, who has a passion for Hollywood cop movies. Danny longs to experience the gunfights and car chases he sees in those movies. Angel is quick to dismiss Danny’s childish fantasies, but, when a series of grisly accidents rocks the village, Angel becomes convinced that there’s a dangerous mass murderer on the loose. Danny’s dreams of high-octane police action soon become a reality.

The first half or so of HOT FUZZ is a hilarious, genial spoof of police thrillers and village life in England. Then, however, the movie’s R-rated gruesome violence and strong foul language kick into gear. The story also descends into a politically correct attack on conservative tradition in English villages. Even the local Christian vicar is unmasked as a villain who spouts a blasphemy at one point. Here, it should be pointed out that the comic hero proclaims in the middle of the story that he’s agnostic about whether God exists or not. This gives the movie a strong humanist worldview. All of the negative content eventually becomes too excessive, unpalatable and silly.

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4000+ Faith Based Articles and Movie Reviews – Will you Support Us?

Our small team works tirelessly to provide resources to protect families from harmful media, reviewing 415 movies/shows and writing 3,626 uplifting articles this year. We believe that the gospel can transform entertainment. That’s why we emphasize positive and faith-filled articles and entertainment news, and release hundreds of Christian movie reviews to the public, for free. No paywalls, just trusted, biblically sound content to bless you and your family. Online, Movieguide is the closest thing to a biblical entertainment expert at your fingertips. As a reader-funded operation, we welcome any and all contributions – so if you can, please give something. It won’t take more than 52 seconds (we timed it for you). Thank you.