LEMON TREE

If Only We Could All Get Along. . .

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 17, 2009

Starring: Hiam Abbass, Doron Tavory, Ali
Suliman, Rona Lipaz-Michael,
and Tarik Kopty

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 106 minutes

Distributor: IFC Films

Director: Eran Riklis

Executive Producer: Leon Edery, Moshe Edry, and
David Silber

Producer: Eran Riklis

Writer: Suha Arraf and Eran Riklis

Address Comments To:

Jonathan Sehring, President, IFC Films/IFC Entertainment
Joshua Sapan, President/CEO, Rainbow Media Holdings LLC
(Independent Film Channel/IFC Films/IFC First Take/AMC/WE)
11 Penn Plaza
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 324-8500
Website: www.rainbow-media.com

Content:

(B, FR, Pa, E, PC, So, L, V, S, A, M) A largely biblical, moral worldview weighing property rights against security rights on the Israeli/Palestinian border, with some false pagan environmentalism when trees are equated with people who have souls, plus some left-oriented politically correct, socialist content turning the Israeli-Palestinian conflict into a class warfare; three obscenities, no profanities; a party is disturbed by what sounds like gunfire, an innocent woman’s house is ransacked by troops looking for snipers, a woman tending her lemon grove is mistreated by Israeli troops; no depicted sex but a lawyer appears to want sexual favors from a client; no nudity; modest alcohol use; no smoking; and, intimidation and married woman is unhappy in her marriage.


Summary:

LEMON TREE is a sad Israeli movie about a Palestinian widow whose family lemon grove is ordered uprooted for security reasons when the Israeli defense minister moves next door. The widow’s fight to save her trees shows the Israelis to be heavy handed but fails to show the Islamic, Arab hatred that leads to such drastic security measures.


Review:

LEMON TREE is a sad Israeli movie about a Palestinian widow named Salma who tends a lemon grove handed down through generations of her family. When the Israeli defense minister moves to a new house beside the grove, an order is given to uproot the trees for security reasons. Salma hires a lawyer to fight for her trees.
LEMON TREE exposes some of the lunacy that occurs as a result of terrorism. The defense minister and his wife do not fear Salma, who wants nothing but to tend her grove and harvest lemons. They fear the killers who would hide in the trees to attack the defense minister. Mira, the defense minister’s wife, even winds up taking a public stand for Salma, but to no avail.
Israel does not come off looking good in this movie. The wealthy and powerful Israelis ruin the life of a Palestinian woman whom they know is harmless, but they do it for the same reason we take our shoes off at airports. Terrorism costs everyone, including peaceful Palestinians.
The movie contrasts the relative wealth of Israel with the poverty of Palestine. It gives the impression that both the Israelis and Palestinians would like to get along. What it fails to show is the hatred that cost Salma her trees. There is a scene where a party at the defense minister’s house is disrupted by sounds coming from the grove, but you do not see who caused the disruption. You do see Israeli troops ransack Salma’s house in response.
The movie is not entertainment. It’s more like taking medicine. The sad story tries to raise the question, “Why can’t we just all get along?” The sad answer is Islamic Jihad.
Why can’t we all just fly on planes like we used to – without any security check? Why are Americans troops in Iraq and Afghanistan? There are a lot of expensive, unpleasant things done in response to Islamic terrorism.


In Brief:

LEMON TREE is a sad Israeli movie about a Palestinian widow named Salma who tends a lemon grove handed down through generations of her family. When the Israeli defense minister moves to a new house beside the grove, an order is given to uproot the trees for security reasons. Salma hires a lawyer to fight for her trees. The defense minister and his wife do not fear Salma, who wants only to tend her grove and harvest lemons. They fear the killers who might hide in the trees to attack the defense minister. Mira, the defense minister’s wife, winds up taking a public stand for Salma, but to no avail.
Israel does not come off looking good in LEMON TREE. The wealthy and powerful Israelis ruin the life of a Palestinian woman who they know is harmless, but they do it for the same reason we take our shoes off at airports. Terrorism costs everyone, including peaceful Palestinians. LEMON TREE is not entertainment. It’s more like taking medicine. This sad story tries to raise the question, “Why can’t we just all get along?” The sad answer is Islamic terrorism.