U.N. ME Add To My Top 10

Using Michael Moore’s Style To Expose the Left

Content -1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 01, 2012

Starring: N/A

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films

Director: Matthew Groff, Ami Horowitz

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Matthew Groff, Ami Horowitz

Writer: Matthew Groff, Ami Horowitz

Address Comments To:

Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO
Meyer Gottlieb, President, Samuel Goldwyn Films
9570 West Pico Blvd., 4th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 860-3100; Fax: (310) 860-3195
Website: www.samuelgoldwynfilms.com; Email: info@samuelgoldwynfilms.com

Content:

(BBB, VV, S, A, MM) Very strong truth-revealing moral worldview in a spot-on portrait of the rampant corruption and incompetence epidemic in the United Nations and a detailed look at the many sins committed by alleged UN peacekeepers in trouble zones around the world; no foul language; strong violence includes news footage of dead bodies from massacres around the globe, home video footage of UN snipers opening fire on a crowd of peaceful protesters before the camera cuts to show the aftermath of dead bodies and crying, wounded survivors, and several shots from archival footage of nuclear bomb tests obliterating cars and other objects; some sexual references include hidden cameras showing U.N. peacekeepers dancing wildly (albeit clothed) with prostitutes, some of whom are described as underage, in an Ivory Coast bar, and movie mentions more than 1000 claims of rape and sexual abuse by U.N. troops; no nudity; U.N. peacekeepers are shown partying with alcohol; and, references to corruption, graft, bribery associated with the United Nations and U.N. officials are caught repeatedly lying to the interviewer.

Summary:

U.N. ME is a spot-on portrait of the rampant corruption and incompetence epidemic in the United Nations. The filmmakers are to be commended for bringing out these issues in a humorous yet sober way, but caution is advised for children due to some of the subject matter and references to immorality.

Review:

U.N. ME is a truth-revealing and spot-on portrait of the rampant corruption and incompetence epidemic in the United Nations. It’s a detailed look at the many sins committed by alleged U.N. peacekeepers in trouble zones around the world. U.N. ME also has an ingeniously humorous approach that finally finds a conservative filmmaker having the ability to match the humorous tactics of left-wing propagandist Michael Moore.



Filmmaker Ami Horowitz co-writes and co-directs with Matthew Groff. Ami also narrates the movie. The documentary is about his quest to expose the many failings of the U.N., such as its failure to stop massacres in Bosnia and Rwanda, its ordering its peacekeeping forces to party rather than help others, its inability to stop nuclear proliferation, and finally its hopelessness in fighting terrorism. Bureaucrats appear to occupy and complicate every level of decision making. Furthermore, although the United States is often the brunt of criticism from the United Nations, the United States spends billions on the U.N. each year.



These are all points that should and must be made. Groff and Horowitz are to be commended for bringing them out in the open. While a documentary will generally hurt the chance for interested audiences to see a movie, U.N. ME’s ample use of clever humor and its clearly defined points should hold an appeal for many moviegoers. Caution is advised for younger children regarding some of the content and references, including references to rape and violent newsreel footage.

In Brief:

U.N. ME is a truth-revealing, acccurate portrait of the rampant corruption and incompetence epidemic in the United Nations. It’s a detailed look at the many sins committed by alleged U.N. peacekeepers in trouble zones around the world. The sins include charges of rape and prostitutes. U.N. ME also details the U.N.’s failure to stop massacres, its inability to stop nuclear proliferation and its hopelessness in fighting terrorism. Bureaucrats appear to occupy and complicate every level of decision making. Furthermore, although the United States is often the brunt of criticism from the United Nations, the United States spends billions on the U.N. each year.

U.N. ME has an ingenious humorous approach that finally finds a conservative filmmaker having the ability to match the humorous tactics of left-wing propagandist Michael Moore. U.N. ME’s ample use of clever humor and its clearly defined points should hold an appeal for many moviegoers. The filmmakers are to be commended for bringing out these issues. Caution is advised for children, however, regarding some of the content and references to immorality, including references to violent newsreel footage. U.N. ME is an excellent exposé of international politics.