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WARRIOR NUN: Incompetent & Ill Advised for Adult Audiences

Photo via Warrior Nun Netflix Instagram

WARRIOR NUN: Incompetent & Ill Advised for Adult Audiences

By Trevor Jones, Contributing Writer

WARRIOR NUN is an original supernatural action drama on Netflix.

The first season of WARRIOR NUN features decent camera work, great fight choreography, and rebelling against corruption. However, with a TV-MA rating, the show is weighed down by unlikeable heroes, a painstakingly slow-paced first half, anti-Christian values, and incompetent writing.

The show follows Ava Silva, a 19-year-old orphan recently brought back to life by an ancient order of warrior Catholic nuns. Ava will develop her newly discovered powers while training under the Order of the Cruciform Sword (OCS). Along the way, she uncovers crimson demons, her haunted past, and secrets within the Vatican itself.

WARRIOR NUN’s worldview is violent and anti-Christian. Unlike real nuns, who usually practice humility, prayer, and pacifism, the fictional nuns are ultra-violent. They nonlethally batter countless men and demons with crosses, batons, and jabs. These nuns are agile and proficient, but they show no restraint or mercy.

For example, one nun battles with her dual wielding shotguns. In another example, a priest strangles a bodyguard for information. The OCS nuns do not pray on screen and frequently argue with each other. These nuns and priests are basically mercenaries draped in religious attire.

Human blood is frequent, demons are shown in full haunting capacity, and gore is abundant. The nuns use swear words in every sentence, which makes no sense if these characters were actually nuns. Ava hooks up with a vagabond boy for the first half of the season and develops feelings for him. In episode four, they strip down to their underwear and kiss.

A Vatican cardinal serves as the central antagonist. He orchestrates a takeover as the pope and orders the arrest of the OCS. WARRIOR NUN portrays the Vatican as a malevolent force. While this is a different twist on the Vatican as the villain, the direct attack makes it less believable.

The core issue with WARRIOR NUN is its lack of subtlety. Ava constantly berates her superiors, rarely thinks her plans through, and is quite simply irritating. She openly mocks the Church’s history and its “patriarchal” leanings. Her commentary is not on the nose, it is down one’s nose. Ava spends her first five episodes not even training as the “Warrior Nun.”

WARRIOR NUN includes a handful of positives. It picks up when Ava and the OCS concoct a plan to steal a dangerous artifact from the Vatican’s hands. The show makes great visual use of its destination shots in Spain. The fight choreography, while needless in most instances, is still well executed.

In conclusion, WARRIOR NUN is a failed attempt at believably exploring Catholic themes in an action-packed manner. The writers condemn pacifist nuns and priests, use too much on-the-nose commentary, and have written one of the most annoying main characters ever to grace your screen.

While the series may appeal to mature audiences, it is not worthwhile for those who desire good television. Christians and non-Christians alike should skip this series altogether.

 

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