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Now more than ever we’re bombarded by darkness in media, movies, and TV. Movieguide® has fought back for almost 40 years, working within Hollywood to propel uplifting and positive content. We’re proud to say we’ve collaborated with some of the top industry players to influence and redeem entertainment for Jesus. Still, the most influential person in Hollywood is you. The viewer.

 

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Dear readers, Please don’t scroll past this message!

 

Now more than ever we’re bombarded by darkness in media, movies, and TV. Movieguide® has fought back for almost 40 years, working within Hollywood to propel uplifting and positive content. We’re proud to say we’ve collaborated with some of the top industry players to influence and redeem entertainment for Jesus. Still, the most influential person in Hollywood is you. The viewer.

 

What you listen to, watch, and read has power. Movieguide® wants to give you the resources to empower the good and the beautiful. But we can’t do it alone. We need your support. You can make a difference with as little as $7. It takes only a moment. If you can, consider supporting our ministry with a monthly gift. Thank you.

YES, I WANT TO SUPPORT MOVIEGUIDE®!

DOGS IN SPACE: Season Two

"Good Dogs Make a Good Team"

NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

DOGS IN SPACE: Season Two on Netflix follows Stella as she becomes the Captain of Starship Pluto. The former Captain, nicknamed Garbage, struggles to transition to crew member, learning to admit to his mistakes and to supporting Stella in his old position. Stella, Garbage and the crew learn to work together and sort out their differences. The genetically enhanced dogs are travelling the galaxy in search of a new home for humanity. They undergo various adventures along the way. Meanwhile, Captain Stella becomes more and more confident in her abilities to lead the team and make quick decisions in life-or-death situations.

Season Two of DOGS IN SPACE is an action packed, comical, animated series with funny, adorable characters. It has a strong worldview that promotes friendship, teamwork, admitting your mistakes and learning from them, and supporting and listening to others. Though rated TV-Y7, DOGS IN SPACE is surprisingly violent, with intense action sequences in each episode. Also, one character enjoys stealing, a guest character uses occult Zodiac powers, and there’s some environmentalism promoting the climate change hoax. So, MOVIEGUIDE® advises caution for older children.

Content:

(BB, O, Ab, FR, EE, L, VV, MM):

Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:
Strong moral worldview promotes friendship, teamwork, admitting your mistakes and learning from them, and supporting and listening to your friends and crew and shipmates, marred by references to occult Zodiac powers, plus there’s a character with a “God complex” and the season includes some content promoting environmentalism and the leftist climate change hoax

Foul Language:
Light foul language in Season Two includes two instances of “screwed up,” one instance of stupid, one instance of butt

Violence:
Strong action sequences in each episode, such as gunfire, rock crushing, physical fighting, alien goo/carcasses, and aerial spaceship dogfighting

Sex:
No sex

Nudity:
Naturalistic animal nudity

Alcohol Use:
No alcohol use

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
No smoking or drug abuse;

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Characters argue/banter with each other, some questionable names such as Garbage and Chonies (Spanish slang for underwear), one character’s nature revolves around thieving, and three instances of possession but rebuked and overcome.

More Detail:

DOGS IN SPACE is about a group of genetically enhanced dogs travelling the galaxy in search of a new home for humanity. The series follows a group of misfits on the Spacecraft Pluto as they visit different planets, while learning to work together as a team.

Season Two of DOGS IN SPACE follows Stella as she takes up the mantle of Captain. Each episode observes as she becomes more and more confident in her abilities to lead the team and making quick decisions in life-or-death situations. Stella grows with experience, learning to be patient, understanding and commanding over her delinquent team.

DOGS IN SPACE is episodic, but the relationships between the characters grow with each episode. There is still an overarching story, but each episode has its own contained story, with the crew visiting new planets, getting kidnapped, or simply quarrelling with themselves. It’s not until the last three episodes of Season Two that DOGS IN SPACE decides to tell a significant arc, which revolves around the character of Garbage.

Garbage, or ex-Captain Basura, as some of the dogs call him, struggles to be a part of the team after losing the Captaincy in Season One. Garbage struggles to follow Stella’s lead. The change in command is not only an awkward transition for him, but for the rest of the crew as well as Garbage accidently slips out commands every now and then.

Season Two of DOGS IN SPACE also introduces a new supporting character, Pepper. Pepper is much more levelheaded and mature compared to the other dogs in the team. She’s the tactician for the crew, spending time analyzing and strategizing before missions. She’s the opposite of what the rest of the crew is, which, ironically enough, leaves the crew questioning if they should trust her.

The second half of Season Two focuses on Garbage. The season takes its time establishing his backstory and how he was handed the Captaincy by a former mentor and former Captain, Stardust. Stardust would return in the last couple episodes as a ‘Zodiac Wizard’ to check up on Garbage. Upon learning that Garbage has lost his position as Captain, Stardust tries to sabotage Stella so that she loses the Captaincy.

The last arc in the season follows Garbage and Stella as their relationship becomes strained. Stella assumes Garbage sabotaged her to make himself look good. She lashes out, telling him how he always makes mistakes and that she doesn’t want him on the team anymore. Garbage understands her frustrations, because, throughout the season, viewers see him trying to find a way to get the Captaincy back.

Garbage grows at the end of the series, learning what it takes to be a good dog. He risks himself for the team, fixing his relationship with Stella and the crew, but also with Stardust.

Season Two of DOGS IN SPACE is filled with action, comedy and heart-to-heart moments. The animation, though simplistic, works for the series. The first episode of the new season was weak and unimpressive. However, as the series continues, so does the quality of its storytelling.

The second season has a strong moral worldview of teamwork, friendship and trust. It also has a moral tone of admitting your mistakes and learning from them and promotes supporting and listening to your friends, crew and shipmates. However, the program some content promoting environmentalism and the leftist climate change hoax. Also, though rated TV-Y7, the show is surprisingly violent, with intense action sequences in each episode filled with gunfire, explosions and alien goo spilling everywhere. The character names are questionable, such as Garbage and Chonies, which is Spanish slang for underwear. The character of Ed revolves around thieving, which the series never takes the time to explain why it’s bad. Star Dust claims to have a God Complex, becomes a Zodiac Wizard and uses his occult Zodiac powers to rule planets. Finally, DOGS IN SPACE: Season Two has no strong foul language, but there are some light words that are problematic for younger children. So, MOVIEGUIDE® advises caution for older children.

Now more than ever we’re bombarded by darkness in media, movies, and TV. Movieguide® has fought back for almost 40 years, working within Hollywood to propel uplifting and positive content. We’re proud to say we’ve collaborated with some of the top industry players to influence and redeem entertainment for Jesus. Still, the most influential person in Hollywood is you. The viewer.

What you listen to, watch, and read has power. Movieguide® wants to give you the resources to empower the good and the beautiful. But we can’t do it alone. We need your support.

You can make a difference with as little as $7. It takes only a moment. If you can, consider supporting our ministry with a monthly gift. Thank you.