JULIE & JULIA

"A Savory Delight"

Quality:
Content: -1 Discretion advised for older children.

Rent or Buy:

NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

JULIE & JULIA weaves together two stories 50 years apart. The movie stars Meryl Streep as the famous American cook and TV pioneer Julia Child, co-author of MASTERING THE ART OF FRENCH COOKING. It follows Julia as she and her diplomat husband, Paul, begin living in Paris in 1949. It is there that Julia begins her lifelong passion for French cuisine. Fifty-three years later, young Julie Powell, a wannabe writer, decides to spend one year cooking all 524 recipes in Julia Child’s book and writing a blog about it. The question is, will anybody read it?

JULIE & JULIA is a savory dish that will please moviegoers looking for something a little different. Though the story revolves around a passion for fine cooking, it is the passion for life itself that comes across most. Happily, Julie and Julia are committed to their respective marriages, as are their spouses. Regrettably, the movie contains some foul language, including one “f” word. There are also light references to the sex lives of the two married couples. Finally, there are some annoying politically correct moments, including some jokes at the expense of Julia Child’s staid Republican father.

Content:

(B, PC, RH, Ho, LL, V, S, N, A, D) Light moral worldview in story about two career women, with a positive view of marriage, including spouses support one another through thick and thin, plus some politically correct content disparaging Republicans and revisionist history regarding Senator Joseph McCarthy’s campaign against Communist spies in the federal government, and a man is asked if he’s a homosexual; 11 obscenities (including one “f” word), six light profanities and a woman is called the “b” word; angry woman kicks an object in the kitchen and a comic bit on TV where a man dressed as Julia Child cuts his finger, bleeds all over his apron and faints; implied married sex between two married couples, a couple double entendres comparing cooking food to sex and some passionate kissing; brief upper male nudity and back of woman’s bra shown; alcohol use; smoking; and, nothing else objectionable.

More Detail:

JULIE & JULIA is a savory cinematic dish that will please moviegoers looking for something a little different than the usual Hollywood meal. It has some foul language and sexual references, however, so families should leave their pre-teenagers at home. This is a movie meant for older audiences anyway.

Director Nora Ephron, who also adapted the screenplay, weaves together two stories 50 years apart. The movie stars Meryl Streep as the famous American cook and TV pioneer Julia Child, co-author of MASTERING THE ART OF FRENCH COOKING. It follows Julia as she and her diplomat husband, Paul, begin living in Paris in 1949. Desperate to find something to do, Julia decides to become the first woman ever to study at the famous Cordon Bleu cooking school. She meets two Frenchwomen trying to write a French cookbook for American housewives. The rest, as they say, is history.

Beautifully cut into this story of Julia Child’s beginnings as a chef is the story of Julie Powell, a wannabe writer living in Queens with her husband. Julie is stuck working for the city government in New York. With her husband’s support, she decides to spend one year cooking all 524 recipes in Julia Child’s book and writing a blog about it. The question is, will anybody read it?

JULIE & JULIA is based on two non-fiction books – MY LIFE IN FRANCE by Julia Child and JULIE & JULIA by Julie Powell. It is a story about passion, dedication, marriage, and, of course, food. Though much of the story revolves around a passion for fine cooking, it is the passion for life itself that comes across, not only in Meryl Streep’s excellent portrayal of Julia Child but also Amy Adams’ portrayal of Julie Powell. Both characters are also committed to their respective marriages, as are their spouses.

Regrettably, JULIE & JULIA contains some foul language, including one “f” word. There are also some light references to the sex lives of Julie and Eric and Julia and Paul, and a couple double entendres comparing cooking and sexual situations. Finally, there are some annoying politically correct moments. For example, the movie takes a couple potshots at Republicans, particularly Julia’s staid Republican father, who did not approve of her marriage or that of her sister. Also, the movie attacks Sen. Joe McCarthy’s investigations of the State Dept. for which Paul Child worked. It does not mention the fact that McCarthy’s suspicions about the patriotism of the diplomatic corps were generally well founded.

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