CJ7 Add To My Top 10

Family Values Come to Chinese Movies

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 07, 2008

Starring: Stephen Chow, Xu Jiao, Kitty Zhang, Lam Tze, Lee Sheung Ching, Huang Lei, Han Yong Wua, and Yao Wen Xue

Genre: Comedy/Science Fiction

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 86 minutes

Address Comments To:

Michael Barker, Tom Bernard and Marcia Bloom
Co-Presidents
Sony Pictures Classics (Sony Pictures Entertainment)
550 Madison Avenue, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Phone: (212) 833-8833; Fax: (212) 833-8844
Web Page: www.sonyclassics.com
Email: Sony_Classics@spe.sony.c[email protected]

Content:

(BB, L, V, D, M) Strong moral worldview with admonishments not to lie, steal or say bad words, but to be honest and study hard, plus an answered prayer to God and another appeal to God, but references to aliens and UFOs, though wishful thinking is somewhat rebuked; boy says BS twice and is admonished one time, plus one other obscenity and some scatological humor involving pet dung and a man picking his nose; some slapstick cartoony violence, including some martial arts kung fu, man’s glasses smashed, boy beaten up and thrown a ridiculously long distance, father spanks son three times in one scene, man falls in construction accident, pet is squished but bounces back like rubber, and two deaths, but handled in a light manner; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; brief smoking; and, bullying rebuked and transformed and child rebels but eventually counts his blessings and becomes more responsible.

Summary:

CJ7 is a charming, winsome family movie from China about a poor boy who befriends a strange-looking pet from outer space. CJ7 is winsomely amusing, with strong moral lessons, but contains some scatological humor and three obscenities.

Review:

CJ7 is a delightful, winsome family movie from China that teaches strong moral values, but it contains three obscenities and some scatological slapstick humor in a couple scenes.

Little Dicky Chow and his father live in a hovel in Hong Kong. As Dicky tells one of his teachers, his father is a coolie who doesn’t make much money. In fact, they are so poor that his father scavenges shoes and other household necessities from local junkyards.

One day, his father brings home a small ball he found in a junkyard. The ball is left by a spaceship, but, in a funny scene, the father’s back is turned when the ship takes off. The ball’s odd behavior scares Dicky, but his father thinks Dicky is acting up, so he punishes Dicky by making him sit in a cabinet where the ball happens to fall.

That night, the aliens who left the ball take Dicky and the ball to outer space, where a mysterious alien transforms the ball into a rubbery-looking animal resembling a dog, but with an antenna. Back at home, the hungry pet is able to make a rotten apple turn into a ripe apple.

Dicky is having problems at school. He dreams that the little alien pet can improve his life, even granting Dicky special powers. Convinced that the creature can do this, he tries it out at school the next day, but everything ends in disaster. Angry, Dicky is cruel to the creature, which pummels Dicky with its poo. The teachers wash off an embarrassed Dicky in front of the rest of the class. Walking home, Dicky abandons the pet, whom he has named CJ7 after a popular robot toy called CJ1.

Regretting his actions, Dicky makes up with CJ7, but little does he know how important the pet will become in the life of he and his father.

CJ7 is amusing and charming. The unrealistic cartoony slapstick comedy takes a little adjustment especially for teenagers and adults, but the characters are finely drawn. Stephen Chow does a convincing job as the father. Amazingly, Dicky is played by a darling little girl named Xu Jiao (pronounced “Sue Jow”), who in real life is nothing like the rambunctious little Dicky. She does a great job.

According to Mr. Chow, this kind of family movie is completely new to Chinese movies. If so, that is wonderful, because, along the way, the movie stresses strong moral values to children. Even though we are poor, the father tells his son, we do not lie or steal. The father also encourages his son to study hard in school so he can make something of himself when he gets older.

CJ7 does contain some humor about pet dung and nosepicking, however. There are also three obscenities. Thus, MOVIEGUIDE® advises a light caution.

In Brief:

CJ7 is a winsome family movie from China directed by Hong Kong comedy star Stephen Chow. Little Dicky Chow and his father live in a hovel in Hong Kong. They are so poor that his father scavenges household necessities from local junkyards. One day, his father brings back a small ball he found in a junkyard. The ball is left by a spaceship, but Dicky’s father does not see the ship take off. When the ball transforms into a weird-looking alien pet, Dicky thinks the pet has magical powers that will make him succeed at school and enable him to defeat the rich boys who bully him. The creature has other ideas, however.

CJ7 is amusing and charming. Stephen Chow does a convincing job as the father. Amazingly, Dicky is played by a darling little girl named Xu Jiao (pronounced “Sue Jow”), who is nothing like the rambunctious Dicky. She does a great job. Along the way, the movie stresses strong moral values. Even though we are poor, the father tells Dicky, we do not lie or steal. CJ7 contains some scatological humor and three obscenities, so MOVIEGUIDE® advises a light caution.