NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH

Protecting the Source

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 19, 2008

Starring: Kate Beckinsale, Matt Dillon,
Vera Farmiga, Alan Alda,
Angela Bassett, David
Schwimmer, and Noah Wyle

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 107 minutes

Distributor: Yari Film Group

Director: Rod Lurie

Executive Producer: Dennis A. Brown, David C.
Glasser, William J. Immerman,
and James Spies

Producer: Marc Frydman, Bob Yari and Rod
Lurie

Writer: Rod Lurie

Address Comments To:

Bob Yari, Chairman
Yari Film Group
10850 Wilshire Blvd., South
Sixth Floor
Beverly Hills, CA 90024
Phone: (310) 689-1450; Fax: (310) 234-8975

Content:

(H, B, PC, AP, RH, LLL, VV, SS, M) Light humanist worldview where characters in the story look to man instead of God to solve their problems, light moral elements where woman stands by a principle no matter the cost, and light politically correct elements with an anti-government tone containing some revisionist history; 44 obscenities and six profanities; strong violence includes man is shown bleeding from a gunshot wound, woman gets shot off screen but bleeding is shown after the fact, woman gets into fistfight with another woman, woman get hits on the head with a police stick; depicted married sex with characters fully clothed and the camera only shows the man’s back and the woman’s face; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking or drugs; and, implied adultery.

Summary:

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH is a thriller about political journalist Rachel Armstrong, who gets in trouble after writing about a government scandal and revealing the identity of a covert CIA agent. The movie is engaging, well-written and well-acted movie with believable characters, but it contains plenty of foul language, a sex scene and a slight politically correct tone that require strong caution.

Review:

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH is a thriller about Rachel Armstrong, a political journalist, who writes a volatile story about a possible government scandal that reveals the identity of a covert CIA agent. Her story propels the government to action in demanding that she give up her source because classified information has been leaked. Believing herself to be protected by the First Amendment and her rights as a reporter, Rachel refuses to give up the name of her source and finds herself behind bars fighting for the principles upon which she has based her career.

Although the characters and the story for the most part are fictional, the movie as a whole is based on the Plame Affair from 2003 in which the identity of Valerie Plame Wilson, a CIA manager, was revealed in a newspaper column that was fed information by a member of the State Dept.

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH plays off many details from this piece of history and for the most part paints the government as the “bad guys.” Overall, however, the story plays out in such a way that allows the audience to see both sides of the situation: the plight of the CIA agent whose identity has been exposed and the struggle of the journalist who is willing to protect her source no matter the cost. Ultimately, the story sides with the journalist who is portrayed as being victim of government “bullies.”

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH is an engaging, well-written story with believable characters and quality camera work. Although the movie has some slower moments because it is very dialogue-driven, the details and character portrayals are still intriguing. Kate Beckinsale and Vera Farmiga give noteworthy performances that help the audience to empathize with each character’s situation.

However, there are some elements that require caution such as plenty of foul language and a scene of depicted married sex (both characters are fully clothed, however). Also, there seems to be a slight anti-government undertone running through the movie, along with a message that the American government needs to be held accountable for its actions by the people who have enabled it to hold the power. The movie also implies that the press holds governments accountable, but neglects to mention the rampant bias among too many of today’s journalists. For example, the press blew the Plame Affair out of proportion in order to embarrass the Bush administration and failed to report facts that did not fit that agenda.

In Brief:

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH is a thriller about political journalist Rachel Armstrong, who writes a newspaper column about a government scandal that reveals the identity of a covert CIA agent. The government demands that Rachel give up her source because classified information has been leaked. Believing herself to be protected by the First Amendment and her rights as a reporter, Rachel refuses to give up the source’s name. She finds herself behind bars fighting for the principles upon which she has based her career. Although the characters and the story are fictional, the movie is loosely based on the Plame Affair from 2003.

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH is an engaging, well-written story with believable characters and quality camera work. Although the movie has some slower moments because it is very dialogue-driven, the details and character portrayals are still intriguing. However, there are some elements that require caution, including plenty of foul language and a scene of depicted married sex (both characters are fully clothed, however). Also, there seems to be a slight anti-government undertone running through the movie, with the message that the people and the press need to hold the government accountable.