SAVAGE NIGHTS

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 25, 1994

Starring: Cyril Collard, Romane Bohringer, Carlos Lopez, & Corine Blue

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: No MPAA Rating (would be
NC-17)

Runtime: 127 minutes

Distributor: Gramercy Pictures

Director: Cyril Collard

Executive Producer:

Producer: Olivia Ramon & Agnes Berthola

Writer: Cyril Collard

Address Comments To:

Content:

(NA, LL, NN, SSS, VVV, Ho, A/D) Neo-pagan worldview; 12 obscenities & 1 profanity, plus numerous discussions of sexual acts; upper female nudity, multiple graphic depictions of heterosexual & homosexual acts involving 2, 3 or multiple participants; sadomasochistic beating, bloody brawl in restaurant & man nearly castrated by gang; on-screen self-mutilation with knife; HIV infected man continues having sex with multiple partners, many anonymous; and, drinking and cocaine snorting.

Summary:

SAVAGE NIGHTS is the interminable story of an HIV-infected bisexual who is also a public health nightmare, continuing to have sexual encounters (both singly and in groups) with a variety of people of each gender. Amazingly, this appalling film won four Cesars (the French equivalent of the Academy Award), three days after its writer/director/star Cyril Collard died of AIDS.

Review:

SAVAGE NIGHTS is the interminable story of an HIV-infected bisexual who is also a public health nightmare, continuing to have sexual encounters with a variety of people of each gender. Apparently, Jean, the hero, is attempting to learn from his disease, but no such enlightenment occurs. Although Jean is HIV infected, he continues his promiscuous lifestyle with numerous partners and, in particular, with Laura, a 17-year-old. When he tells her he is HIV infected, she hits the roof, but then becomes obsessive and gets into denial. Eventually, Laura enters a psychiatric hospital to regain her equilibrium while Jean continues to wander about seeking meaning to his existence.

Amazingly, this appalling film won four Cesars (the French equivalent of the Academy Award), including Best Picture, three days after its writer/director/star Cyril Collard died of AIDS. Apparently, the French found watching the interminable deterioration of these characters to be cathartic or ennobling, but their behavior is, in fact, mostly aggravating, and at times appalling. If SAVAGE NIGHTS in any way portrays a general philosophical consensus among the denizens of France, immediate evacuation of that country would appear to be a good idea for anyone who respects God, moral values or simple self-preservation.

In Brief: