THE WORLD UNSEEN

Bizarre Political Mixture

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 07, 2008

Starring: Sheetal Sheth, Lisa Ray,
Parvin Dabas, Grethe Fox, and
David Dennis

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 94 minutes

Distributor: Regent Releasing

Director: Shamim Sarif

Executive Producer: Katherine Piretsly and Lisa
Tchenguiz Imerman

Producer: Hanan Kattan

Writer: Shamim Sarif

Address Comments To:

Paul Colichman, CEO
Stephen Jarchon, Chairman
John Lambert, President
Regent Releasing
10990 Wilshire Blvd., Penthouse
Los Angeles, CA 90024
Phone: (310) 806-4278
Fax: (310) 806-4268
Website: www.regentreleasing.com
Email: info@regentreleasing.com

Content:

(RoRoRo, HoHoHo, PCPC, B, L, SS, A, D, M) Very strong Romantic worldview with very strong homosexual viewpoint that’s politically correct, plus some moral elements against racism and apartheid in South Africa; one “s” word, one “bloody” and one light MG; husband slaps wife, police threaten people and man is bleeding after apparently being side-swiped accidentally by truck at night; two women kiss one or two times, lesbian and married woman are attracted to each other with some touching, married woman pulls away in one scene when her baby cries, and implied adulterous fornication by husband against wife; no nudity but woman in bra; alcohol use; smoking; and, lying, cheating, racism rebuked, and homosexual adultery is not really rebuked but heterosexual adultery is.

Summary:

THE WORLD UNSEEN is a period drama about civil rights abuses in the 1950s during the apartheid regime in South Africa but much of its focus is on a developing lesbian relationship between an unconventional restaurant owner and a married woman with three young children. THE WORLD UNSEEN is an average, but beautifully photographed, political movie, with a bizarre mixture of left-wing messages.

Review:

THE WORLD UNSEEN is a beautifully photographed period drama about civil rights abuses in the 1950s during the apartheid regime in South Africa. Its attack on apartheid, however, is done from a very strong Romantic worldview that equates racism with opposition to homosexual behavior.

The story is about a pretty, racially mixed Indian woman named Amina, who runs a restaurant with a middle aged, light-skinned black man, Jacob. The laws have just gotten more strict, and the white police officers are cracking down on any violation.

While Jacob becomes mutually attracted to a middle-aged white customer named Madeleine, Amina becomes mutually attracted to Miriam, an Indian housewife with three children. Miriam tries to repress her attraction to Amina, but apartheid and Miriam’s mean husband, who’s cheating on her, bring the two women together. Will Miriam finally give in to Amina’s seduction? Will her husband come to his senses?

The photography of the South African landscape in THE WORLD UNSEEN is beautiful, but the buildings and interior sets don’t always look real. The rest of the movie is not noteworthy, except for the movie’s salacious homosexual content. Although at the end Miriam does not accept Amina’s invitation to run away with her, she does agree to become her part-time Indian cook, against her husband’s wishes. The movie clearly sides with the radical homosexual agenda, however, equating opposition to sodomy and lesbianism with racial discrimination and opposition to sex between the races. This is absurd, of course. People cannot change the color of their skin, but sexual behavior can be changed. Also, the Bible clearly condemns homosexual behavior, and other examples of sex outside of heterosexual marriage, but it does not promote racism. This is true in both the Hebrew Scriptures and the words of Jesus and his apostles in the New Testament (see Mark 7:20-23, Acts 8:26-39, Romans 1:26-32, 1 Cor. 6:9-11, and Col. 3:11).

Ironically, THE WORLD UNSEEN seems to take a dim view of the husband’s heterosexual infidelity but not his wife’s homosexual infidelity. This shows the kind of twisted thinking that comes when you reject the clear moral teachings of God, whether on the left or the right side of the political spectrum. Sadly, a growing number of American pundits on the right are rejecting clear biblical truth in this and other matters. They are also under increasing pressure from the “news” media to do so. Only a strong defense of the whole Gospel and the entire Bible can turn the tide.

In Brief:

THE WORLD UNSEEN is a period drama about civil rights abuses in the 1950s during the apartheid regime in South Africa. Its focus, however, is on a developing lesbian relationship. Amina is a beautiful young woman who runs a restaurant with a middle aged, light-skinned black man, Jacob. The racial laws have become stricter, and the white police are cracking down on violations. Jacob becomes attracted to a middle-aged white customer. Meanwhile, Amina becomes mutually attracted to Miriam, an Indian housewife with three children. Miriam tries to repress her attraction to Amina, but apartheid and Miriam’s mean husband, who’s cheating on her, bring the two women together. Will Miriam finally give in to Amina’s seduction?

The photography of the South African landscape in THE WORLD UNSEEN is beautiful, but the buildings and interior sets sometimes seem fake. The rest of the movie is average. THE WORLD UNSEEN is clearly done from a Romantic worldview, in the philosophical sense. Its views against forced racial segregation have merit, but its pro-homosexual viewpoint is immorally perverse. The husband’s heterosexual infidelity is rebuked but not his wife’s homosexual infidelity. How bizarre! And, how typical!