CAST AWAY

Riding the Waves of Life

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 22, 2000

Starring: Tom Hanks & Helen Hunt

Genre: Adventure

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 87 minutes

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Director: Robert Zemeckis

Executive Producer: Joan Bradshaw

Producer: Steve Starkey, Tom Hanks,
Robert Zemekis, & Jack Rapke

Writer: William Broyles, Jr.

Address Comments To:

Tom Rothman & Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
A division of Fox, Inc. & News Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90025
(310) 277-2211

Content:

(B, C, H, L, VV, N, A, D, M) Vaguely moral worldview with very slight Christian content, as well as some totemism, humanism & existential fatalism; 5 lightweight exclamatory profanities, such as “my God,” & 4 obscenities; action violence including frightening storm, flight attendant gets hit on head producing copious amounts of blood, plane sinks into ocean, man rides out storm, man gets cut & bruised, man gashes leg on coral, & man knocks out his own impacted tooth with a rock & an ice skate; no sex, but kissing; upper male nudity & man in underwear; drinking, smoking; and, man takes pride that he stole or borrowed a little child's bike to complete his Federal Express delivery, man lies about his wife & man talks to totem that he creates.

Summary:

In CAST AWAY, Tom Hanks plays Chuck Noland, an international troubleshooter for Federal Express whose plane crashes over the Pacific Ocean, and so he has to survive for four years on a desert island. Tom Hanks does a superb job, but some of the minor characters are stilted, the plot does not run smoothly, much of the movie seems like an advertisement for Fed Ex, and the movie ends on a fatalistic note.

Review:

CAST AWAY is a movie that you’d like to like, especially since it stars the likeable Tom Hanks and has been produced by many likeable entertainment industry people. Furthermore, CAST AWAY is a movie that has a good heart and wants to make some moral points. However, in the final analysis, CAST AWAY is easy to criticize, which is highly regrettable.

Tom Hanks plays Chuck Noland, who is an international troubleshooter for Federal Express. The movie opens with the delivery of a Federal Express package in Moscow that Chuck shipped to himself so that he could see how long the delivery took. He tells his Moscow team that time is everything, that they cannot be a minute late.

Then, he flies back to Memphis to see his girlfriend, Kelly. They want to spend some quality time together, but he is called immediately to Southeast Asia to deal with another Fed Ex problem.

Halfway over the Pacific Ocean, his plane is brought down by a terrible storm. Chuck is the only survivor. He reaches a small, deserted island and survives against all odds for four years. Improvising tools out of things he found in Fed Ex boxes such as ice skates and a Wilson basketball, which he turns into a totemistic friend, to whom he talks constantly.

After many harrowing experiences, even attempting suicide, he decides to get off the island at all cost. He’s been there for 1500 days, or more than four years. He even put a cross on the highest point. Miraculously, he survives a difficult journey on a wood raft, and comes back to find out that the world is not what he expected.

Tom Hanks does a superb job in the role of Chuck. Some of the minor characters, however, are slightly stilted. Furthermore, the plot does not run smoothly. There are several plot problems that are solved by a deus ex machina, such as a whale that revives him in critical moments or the Wilson totem that seems to help him create fire. Furthermore, much of the movie seems like an advertisement for Fed Ex, and one can only hope that they paid for this long commercial. The most disappointing part of the movie, however, is that it ends on an existential fatalistic note, summarized by the phrase, “what the tide can bring.” Like THE KID and FAMILY MAN, it is clear that Chuck is supposed to learn some lessons, such as Hollywood's favorite theme that there is more to life than work. Of course, there’s also more to life than no work on a desert island.

There are some slight Christian hints in the movie, but they are very slight, such as the recurring theme of angel wings and what could be construed as a cross that Chuck plants on the top of the mountain on his island. Furthermore, Chuck always makes the right decision, even rejecting adultery, but often his heart is not in it.

On the other hand, CAST AWAY is a very entertaining movie. Tom Hanks pulls off a tour de force with his solo performance. The cinematography is beautiful, and everybody ooh-ed and ah-ed about it at the screening, and the special effects are superb.

In Brief:

CAST AWAY is easy to criticize, which is regrettable. Tom Hanks plays Chuck Noland, an international troubleshooter for Federal Express who is ruled by the clock. Over the Pacific Ocean, his plane crashes, and Chuck has to survive for four years on a desert island. After many harrowing experiences, he survives a difficult journey on a wood raft and comes back to find out that the world is not what he expected.

Tom Hanks does a superb job, but some of the minor characters are slightly stilted, and the plot does not run smoothly. Furthermore, much of the movie seems like an advertisement for Fed Ex. The most disappointing part of the movie, however, is that it ends on an existential fatalistic note. Like THE KID and FAMILY MAN, it is clear that Chuck is supposed to learn some lessons, such as Hollywood's favorite theme that there is more to life than work. Of course, there’s also more to life than no work on a desert island. There are some slight Christian hints in the movie, but they are very slight. On the other hand, the cinematography is beautiful, and the special effects are superb