CONVERSATIONS WITH GOD Add To My Top 10

False, Evil Mumblings About Love and God

Content -4
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 27, 2006

Starring: Henry Czerny, Ingrid Boulting, Bruce Page, and Vilma Silva

Genre: Biographical Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 111 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films

Director: Stephen Simon

Executive Producer: Gay Hendricks

Producer: Stephen Simon

Writer: Eric DelaBarre

Address Comments To:

Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO
Meyer Gottlieb, President
Samuel Goldwyn Films
9570 West Pico Blvd., 4th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 860-3100
Fax: (310) 860-3195

Content:

(PaPaPa, FRFRFR, OOO, AbAbAb, AAA, MMM) False religion, spiritualist, evil beliefs presented as a message from God, with various messages that oppose scripture presented as messages from God; no foul language, violence, sex or nudity; very drunk man disturbs couple having conversation, protagonist lives among drunken hobos, and man offers alcohol to another man; and, false, meaningless, selfish platitudes are spouted.

Summary:

ONVERSATIONS WITH GOD is a portion of the life story of Neale Donald Walsch, a man who went from homeless to millionaire author after supposedly hearing from god and transcribing his conversation. MOVIEGUIDE® does not recommend anyone see this abhorrent movie, because Walsch’s beliefs about God and morality contradict Scripture and lead people away from Jesus Christ and His salvation.

Review:

In CONVERSATIONS WITH GOD, Henry Czerny gives a rather wooden performance as Neale Donald Walsch, the popular author of numerous spiritualist books. Hopping back and forth between lectures, book signings and the author’s past, the movie generates more questions than answers. Apparently Neale was unable to stay married (several times) and was unwelcome to even visit his children, though the movie gives no indication why.

In 1990, his neck was injured in an automobile accident. Because of his injury, he lost his job and no one was willing to hire him. He wound up living in a tent surrounded by winos and can collectors and eating garbage out of dumpsters. When his neck healed, he got a job at a radio station that promptly went bankrupt.

The movie drags its way through all this suffering. Then, one night Walsch’s god speaks to him so clearly it looks as if Walsch thought it was audible, “Have you had enough yet? Are you ready now?”

Suddenly, Walsch is transformed into a self-proclaimed prophet. His false god just pours out his thoughts as if he hasn’t had anyone to talk to in a billion years. Walsch jots the thoughts down and everyone who reads them is transformed. Walsch becomes a popular author with a fanatic following of people who believe Walsch is a window to the wisdom of the ages.

Walsch’s hip god comes out with lines like, “You’ve got me all wrong,” “You are your own rule maker,” “Love is all there is,” and ”What would love do?” Walsch’s god is not into judgment and advises people that working at a job they don’t like is akin to being dead.

The problem with this kind of thing is that some concepts based on Scripture get tossed in, making it difficult for some Christians to sort out the truth from the spiritual dumpster material. 1 John 4:8 says, “God is Love.” Hebrews 13:5 says, “I shall never leave you or forsake you.” These are mixed into the movie along with all the nonsense Walsch attributes to the real God.

To avoid being led astray by love-is-everything spiritualists, Christians should know what love really is. 1 Corinthians 13 is known as the love chapter in the New Testament. There, you will find that love is patient, kind, unselfish, humble, courteous and peaceful, and that it rejoices in the truth, in righteousness and does not delight in evil. Love lights the path away from sin and toward righteousness. The ultimate act of love is found in John 3:16, “For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” Thus, CONVERSATIONS WITH GOD leads people away from Jesus Christ, away from His truth and away from His true, redemptive love.

In prayer, Christians talk to God; in faith, they listen to Him, but always through God's written revelation in the Bible. In John 10:27, Jesus said, “My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me.” The key to hearing from God is being prepared to follow what the Holy Bible tells you. Love is not about making your own rules. It is about hearing God word through Scripture and sharing his love with those he directs unto your path.

MOVIEGUIDE does not recommend anyone see this abhorrent movie, CONVERSATIONS WITH GOD, because Walsch’s god’s comments do not line up with Scripture.

In Brief:

CONVERSATIONS WITH GOD is part of the life story of Neale Donald Walsch. Walsch went from homeless to millionaire author after supposedly hearing from God and transcribing his conversation. Walsch’s hip god comes out with lines like, “You’ve got me all wrong,” “You are your own rule maker,” “Love is all there is,” and “What would love do?” Walsch’s god is not into judgment and advises people that working at a job they hate is akin to being dead. Walsch mixes in biblical passages like 1 John 4:8 (“God is love”) with all sorts of immoral nonsense and falsehoods.

To avoid being led astray by this abhorrent, boring movie, people should know what love really is. 1 Corinthians 13 of the New Testament defines true love. There, you will find that love is patient, kind, unselfish, humble, courteous and peaceful, and that it rejoices in the truth, in righteousness and does not delight in evil. Love lights the path away from sin and toward righteousness. Thus, MOVIEGUIDE® does not recommend this abhorrent movie because it adds things to Scripture and leads people away from Jesus Christ and His truth and salvation.