CROUPIER

"Not Quite on the Ball"

Quality: Content: -3 "EXCESSIVE"
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

Content:

(PaPa, LLL, VV, SS, NNN, AA, DD, MM) Pagan worldview with a nihilistic, cynical tone; 38 obscenities & 1 mild exclamatory profanity (“Oh, my God”); moderate violence such as two men beaten up by two men in two different circumstances, police arrest would-be thieves in gambling casino, murder takes place off screen, & image of murdered person (but no gruesome wounds shown); depicted fornication & implied fornication; upper male nudity, upper female nudity & full female nudity in bedroom; many images of alcohol use, a bit of drunkenness & people in places with saloons; smoking & reference to drug use; and, gambling, attempted robbery, deceit, strained relationship between father & son, & older man has relationship with much younger woman.

Summary:

CROUPIER is a well-written and well-directed, but morally flawed, film noir about a young struggling author in London who returns to his former career running a roulette wheel at a casino, but gets involved in a robbery scheme. An extremely well-made movie featuring interesting characters in a unique setting, CROUPIER nevertheless includes plenty of strong foul language, sexual situations, nudity, and an ironic ending with a nihilistic, cynical tone.

Review:

CROUPIER is a well-written and well-directed, but morally flawed, film noir from English director Mike Hodges. Hodges has achieved a cult status from three movies he made in the early 1970s, GET CARTER, PULP and THE TERMINAL MAN. In the story, Clive Owen plays a struggling author named Jack from South Africa, who returns to his former career running a roulette wheel when his father helps him land a job at a London gambling casino. Jack uses his experiences for the plot of his book, I, CROUPIER. He also meets a beautiful, mysterious woman gambler from South Africa, played by Alex Kingston of TV’s ER, who entices him to join her associates in a robbery scheme. Ironic plot twists leave Jack battered, bemused and beguiled, while finding an unexpected source of love.
An extremely well-made, entertaining movie featuring interesting characters in a unique setting, CROUPIER nevertheless includes plenty of strong foul language, some graphic sexual situations and a scene of extreme nudity. Concerning the latter, suffice it to say that viewers get a chance to see what attracts Dr. Green of TV’s ER. Also, the movie’s ironic ending has a nihilistic, cynical tone about it.

In Brief:

CROUPIER is a well-written and well-directed, but morally flawed, film noir from English director Mike Hodges. Hodges has achieved a cult status from three movies he made in the early 1970s, GET CARTER, PULP and THE TERMINAL MAN. In the story, Clive Owen plays a struggling author named Jack from South Africa, who returns to his former career running a roulette wheel when his father helps him land a job at a London gambling casino. Jack uses his experiences for the plot of his book, I, CROUPIER. He also meets a beautiful, mysterious woman gambler from South Africa, played by Alex Kingston of TV’s ER, who entices him to join her associates in a robbery scheme. Ironic plot twists leave Jack battered, bemused and beguiled, while finding an unexpected source of love.
An extremely well-made, entertaining movie featuring interesting characters in a unique setting, CROUPIER nevertheless includes plenty of strong foul language, some graphic sexual situations and a scene of extreme nudity. Concerning the latter, suffice it to say that viewers get a chance to see what attracts Dr. Green of TV’s ER. Also, the movie’s ironic ending has a nihilistic, cynical tone about it