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AHSOKA: Episode 1.1 and 1.2: Part One: “Master and Apprentice” and Part Two: “Toil and Trouble”

"Female Heroes and Villains"

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What You Need To Know:

MOVIEGUIDE® recently watched the first two episodes of AHSOKA, Disney and Lucasfilm’s new STAR WARS series on Disney Plus. AHSOKA is a live action program based on a major female character in several animated STAR WARS series from the last 20 years. Ahsoka Tano, Anakin Skywalker’s former apprentice, reunites with her own former apprentice, Sabine, to search for the last remaining Imperial admiral from the defeated Empire. Grand Admiral Thrawn escaped justice and disappeared when the Rebel Alliance beat the evil Empire in RETURN OF THE JEDI. An evil witch has hired a Force-adept mercenary to help her find Admiral Thrawn before Ahsoka does.

The first two episodes of AHSOKA are engaging and exciting. They are also pretty wholesome and family friendly. The story continues the basic STAR WARS plot of freedom fighters opposing tyrannical forces. However, the second episode has an anti-capitalist subplot. The episodes also have references to the mystical powers of “The Force,” and the major female villain is part of a cult of female witches who side with the old Empire. So, MOVIEGUIDE® advises caution for older children.

Content:

(Pa, B, P, AC, FR, O, ACap, VV, M)

Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:
Mixed pagan worldview about some good guys living in a society with a republican form of government who fight against tyrannical forces trying to start a war and take over the society again, but the good guys wield mystical powers, a female villain is called a witch, and there’s an anti-capitalist subplot in the second of two episodes reviewed Foul

Violence:
Lots of action violence includes several STAR WARS lightsaber duels, a spaceship fires on another ship, laser battles with hand weapons, a villain stabs two people to death with his laser sword, a character is stabbed in the stomach with a lightsaber but survives and recovers, and lots of jumping around and using telekinetic powers during fight scenes

Sex:
No sex

Nudity:
No nudity

Alcohol Use:
No alcohol use

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
No smoking or drugs; and,

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Bad guys infiltrate shipyards run by a freedom-loving society with a republican form of government.

More Detail:

In the first two episodes of AHSOKA, Disney and Lucasfilm’s new STAR WARS series on Disney+, Anakin Skywalker’s former apprentice, Ahsoka Tano, reunites with her own former apprentice, Sabine, to begin a search for the last remaining Imperial admiral from the fallen Empire, who escaped justice. The first two episodes of AHSOKA have some rousing moments, are pretty wholesome and continue the basic STAR WARS story of fighting against tyranny, but the episodes include references to the mystical powers of “The Force,” an anti-capitalist subplot and a major villain who’s part of a cult of female witches who use the “Dark Side of the Force.”

The first episode opens a few years after the defeat of the Empire by the Rebel Alliance in the movie RETURN OF THE JEDI. A military spaceship run by the New Republic is transporting the female witch, Morgan Elsbeth, who fought for the Empire, to prison. Ahsoka was the one who had captured Morgan. She also wrenched from her information about the whereabouts of a star map showing the location of Grand Admiral Thrawn, the last of the defeated Empire’s admirals on the loose.

However, the over-confidant captain of the prison ship lets an evil Sith Lord, a practitioner of the Dark Side of the Force named Baylan Skoll, and his young blonde female apprentice, Shin, on

board. Baylan had used an old Jedi code to contact the prison ship, and the captain has a clear disdain for those knights of old because of how easily Emperor Palpatine defeated them years ago before the Rebel Alliance was formed.

Meanwhile, Ahsoka, accompanied by her companion droid Huyung, searches an underground temple on the home planet of the witches. She finds a metal ball but is attacked by five droids, apparently sent by Morgan. When the droids decide to self-destruct, she’s saved just in the nick of time by Huyung, who’s piloting her ship, the Fulcrum.

The map on the metal ball is hidden and requires a key of some kind to unlock it. So, Ahsoka consults her former apprentice, Sabine Wren, who’s adept at art and technology. Against Ahsoka’s orders, Sabine takes the ball to her residence atop a communications tower on the planet Lothal, site of a huge battle between the Rebel Alliance and Admiral Thrawn. She figures out the key to unlocking the map, which leads to a location in a nearby galaxy.

However, three droids and a masked soldier from Morgan attack Sabine and steal the ball with the unlocked map. In the process, Sabine is severely wounded.

In Episode Two, Sabine recuperates from her wounds. Meanwhile, Ahsoka, Huyung and General Hera Syndulla of the New Republic learn that Morgan is stealing ships and materials from the New Republic shipyards on a planet called Corellia. They investigate and try to place a tracker on a ship being hijacked by Morgan’s mercenaries. However, they find that the shipyards have been infiltrated by loyalists to the Galactic Empire. So, they must fight their way to safety.

The first two episodes of AHSOKA feature an engaging story with appealing characters and plenty of exciting action scenes. The two episodes are also pretty wholesome and family friendly.

The story continues the basic STAR WARS plot of freedom fighters opposing tyrannical forces. However, the second episode has an anti-capitalist subplot. For example, a smarmy manager running the shipyards says he has investors who are trying to sell off parts of the Empire’s old fleet to make a profit. This scheme turns out to be a ruse for Empire loyalists like Morgan Elsbeth looking to start undermine the New Republic and start a new war.

Like some other STAR WARS television programs on Disney+, though certainly not all, the first two episodes of AHSOKA have multiple references to the mystical powers of The Force. For instance, Ahsoka uses the Force to find the metal ball containing the star map. She also uses the Force to move objects and people during fight scenes with the bad guys and with evil robots.

AHSOKA also has a new wrinkle in that the main female villain, Morgan Elsbeth, is part of a cult known as “the Witches of Dathomir.” The witches made their debut in Season 3 of the animated STAR WARS series THE CLONE WARS, which ran from 2008 to 2014 on Cartoon Network and Netflix, with a seventh season running on Disney+ in 2020. The Witches of Dathomir use a magical green energy on their planet to manipulate the powers of the Force in unique ways. The first two episodes of AHSOKA don’t refer to this, however, nor do they explain why Morgan is called a witch.

The anti-capitalist, mystical and magical content in AHSOKA warrant caution for older children.

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Our small team works tirelessly to provide resources to protect families from harmful media, reviewing 415 movies/shows and writing 3,626 uplifting articles this year. We believe that the gospel can transform entertainment. That’s why we emphasize positive and faith-filled articles and entertainment news, and release hundreds of Christian movie reviews to the public, for free. No paywalls, just trusted, biblically sound content to bless you and your family. Online, Movieguide is the closest thing to a biblical entertainment expert at your fingertips. As a reader-funded operation, we welcome any and all contributions – so if you can, please give something. It won’t take more than 52 seconds (we timed it for you). Thank you.


4000+ Faith Based Articles and Movie Reviews – Will you Support Us?

Our small team works tirelessly to provide resources to protect families from harmful media, reviewing 415 movies/shows and writing 3,626 uplifting articles this year. We believe that the gospel can transform entertainment. That’s why we emphasize positive and faith-filled articles and entertainment news, and release hundreds of Christian movie reviews to the public, for free. No paywalls, just trusted, biblically sound content to bless you and your family. Online, Movieguide is the closest thing to a biblical entertainment expert at your fingertips. As a reader-funded operation, we welcome any and all contributions – so if you can, please give something. It won’t take more than 52 seconds (we timed it for you). Thank you.