BARCELONA Add To My Top 10

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Release Date: July 29, 1994

Starring: Taylor Nichols, Chris Eigeman, Tushka Bergen, Mira Sorvino, Pep Munne, Thomas Gibson, & Jack Gilpin

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Adults & older teenagers

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 101 minutes

Distributor: Fine Line Features

Director: Whit Stillman

Executive Producer:

Producer: Whit Stillman

Writer: Whit Stillman

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Content:

(B, LL, SS, A, D, C) Underlying moral worldview; 3 obscenities & 20 profanities; implied & briefly depicted fornication; alcohol use in several bar scenes; implied cocaine use; and, some instances of biblical faith, prayer and Bible study.

Summary:

Whit Stillman's BARCELONA is a winsome romantic comedy about love, family and American identity that manages to entertain and uplift without resorting to heavy-handed moralizing or blatant audience manipulation. The film's chief strength lies in its sophisticated, witty script which gives its characters the freedom to pursue Christian values with dignity and is tinged with an unmistakable pro-America sentiment.

Review:

Whit Stillman's BARCELONA is a winsome romantic comedy about love, family and American identity that manages to entertain and uplift without resorting to heavy-handed moralizing or blatant audience manipulation. Set during "the last decade of the Cold War," the film focuses on the life of Ted Boynton, a nerdy American sales representative abroad trying to find success in business and in love in a culture that sees Americans as overbearing, unintellectual fascists. When Ted falls for a young Spanish woman who is under the spell of a leftist, pseudo-intellectual, local columnist, an amusing ideological tug-of-war ensues, and Ted suddenly finds himself having to choose between love for woman, love for family and love for country.

BARCELONA's chief strength lies in its sophisticated, witty script which gives its characters the freedom to pursue Christian values with dignity and is tinged with an unmistakable pro-American sentiment. In fact, the hero is sympathetically portrayed as someone who struggles to hold onto biblical mores while living in a decadent culture. This follow-up to Stillman's METROPOLITAN is marred, regrettably, by profanity, implied and briefly depicted fornication and implied cocaine use.

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