IMPROPER CONDUCT Add To My Top 10

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Steven Bauer, Tahnee Welch, John Laughlin, Nia Peeples, Lee Anne Beaman, Adrian Zmed, Kathy Shower, Patsy Pease, & Stuart Whitman

Genre: Thriller

Audience: Adults

Rating: N/R

Runtime: 95 Minutes

Distributor: Everest Pictures

Director: Jag Mundhra

Executive Producer:

Producer: Victor Bhalla & Jag Mundhra

Writer: Carl Austin

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Content:

(P, AB, L, SSS, NN) Pagan worldview with an anti-Christian message; 8 obscenities; gratuitous, graphic portrayals of fornication; and, numerous scenes of topless women and partial male nudity.

Summary:

IMPROPER CONDUCT is advertised as a film about sexual harassment, but the film sends a mixed message by portraying the female characters as sex objects. The film includes anti-Christian overtones and comes across like an attempt to slip porn into mainstream theatres under the guise of addressing a serious social problem.

Review:

IMPROPER CONDUCT is advertised as a film about sexual harassment, and the premise is a clear statement that this practice is destructive to both victim and perpetrator. However, the film sends a mixed message by portraying most female characters as sex objects, while supposedly saying that they should not be treated as such. In the movie, Ashley, an attractive young artist, realizes her dreams won't pay the rent so she hires on with a large advertising agency. The CEO transfers his son-in-law Michael from the New York office where he had gotten away with sexual harassment, to L.A. and puts him in charge of Ashley's department. His harassment of Ashley escalates to the point that she quits her job and sues. He wins, and she goes out and gets drunk, and then is killed on her way home. Ashley's sister sets Michael up, gets it on video and uses it to ruin him.

The film includes anti-Christian overtones as both the villains are said to be regular churchgoers. Surprisingly, the dialogue includes fewer than ten obscenities, but rather than speak them, this film shows them. There were a few adequate performances, but for the most part the film plays like melodrama, even evoking laughter from the audience. The film comes across like an attempt to slip porn into mainstream theatres under the guise of addressing a serious social problem.

In Brief: