NEW SUIT Add To My Top 10

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Release Date: May 02, 2003

Starring: Jordan Bridges, Marisa Coughlan, Heather Donahue, Dan Hedaya, Paul McCrane, Charles Rocket, and Paul McCrane

Genre: Satire

Audience: Adults REVIEWER: Dr. Tom
Snyder NEW SUIT is a small,
well-photographed independent
movie that takes a pungent
satirical look at the lies and
deceit permeating Hollywood.
It builds to a hilarious
climax that, nevertheless,
peters out slightly at the
very end. Jordan Bridges plays
a young screenwriter, Kevin,
who comes to Los Angeles to
make his fortune. He strikes
up a romantic relationship
with a beautiful young
producer, Marianne (played by
Marisa Coughlan), who's also
trying to make a name for
herself. Marianne helps Kevin
get a job at Kingdom Pictures
reading scripts for one of his
idols, director Muster Hansau
(played superbly by Dan
Hedaya). Two years later,
however, Kevin is still stuck
in the job, and he and
Marianne are no longer
together. One day, during
lunch, Kevin gets upset with
the superior attitudes of his
male lunch buddies, who are
wildly praising a particular
script even though none of
them has probably read it.
Kevin invents an imaginary
script, "New Suit," that he
claims is even better, and
praises the screenwriter,
Jordan Strawberry, Jordan
being the name of the ice
cream server Kevin's just
visited and Strawberry being
the kind of ice cream he's
just bought. Not wanting to be
upstaged, all of his buddies
agree with Kevin about the
non-existent script. Kevin's
private little joke comes back
to haunt him when everyone
around Hollywood suddenly
starts talking about the "New
Suit" script and Jordan
Strawberry, which has
mysteriously become Jackson
Strawberry. Even the people in
his office start talking about
them. Things go from bad to
worse when Marianne, Kevin's
ex-girlfriend, actually tries
to sell the script as Jackson
Strawberry's agent. Can Kevin
save Marianne from herself and
from the Hollywood hype
machine that has clearly gone
out of control? NEW SUIT
starts too slowly but picks up
very quickly when everyone in
Hollywood begins talking about
Kevin's imaginary script. Some
of the best, most hilarious,
scenes come when Kevin tries
to tell some of his friends
and colleagues that the script
for "New Suit" doesn't exist,
but nobody believes him
because they are so used to
being lied to and cheated in
Hollywood. The story reaches a
climax when the head of
Kingdom Pictures, a Jeffrey
Katzenberg look-alike played
by Paul McCrane who plays Dr.
Romano on TV's ER, tries to
broker a deal for the
imaginary "New Suit" script to
give to Kevin's own boss, who
desperately wants to make sure
his rival doesn't snatch the
script away from him. NEW SUIT
brilliantly captures the lies,
deceit, pride, jealousy, and
perversion rampant in much of
Hollywood. Everyone there is
so used to lying and bragging,
the movie says, that they
refuse to recognize the truth,
even when it hits them in the
proverbial kisser. Kevin's
boss in fact hears about the
"New Suit" script from his
personal prostitute, who
enjoys going around town
touting different scripts to
all the moguls she services.
Everyone in the cast does an
excellent job of presenting
this biting material,
including the two young leads.
The movie falters, however,
during the denouement that
follows the story's climax,
which could have used a few
more laughs and a stronger
moral victory. In the end,
Kevin decides that personal
integrity is more important
than fame and fortune, but his
decision also results in him
deciding to just leave
Hollywood behind him. This
decision is not fully
satisfying because it seems
defeatist and
abrupt. Regrettably, NEW SUIT
contains some very strong foul
and crude language and
references to sex and drugs.
It's too bad the filmmakers
didn't turn their sharp wit as
strongly against these other
kinds of wickedness. For, once
you decide to travel down the
path toward truth and
integrity, you can't stop
shining a light on all the
other ills that surround us in
this fallen world. Thus,
although NEW SUIT has some
strong moral qualities, it
doesn't fully measure up as a
positive redemptive
work. Please address your
comments to: Christina N.
Zilber and Laurent M.
Zilber Co-Presidents Trillion
Entertainment 650 North
Bronson Ave. Suite 134 Los
Angeles, CA 90004 Phone: (323)
871-4456 Fax: (323)
960-4759 Website:
www.trillion-ent.com Email:
into@trillion-ent.com

Rating: R

Runtime: 94 minutes

Distributor: Trillion Entertainment

Director: Francois Velle

Executive Producer:

Producer: Christina N. Zilber and Laurent M. Zilber

Writer: Craig Sherman

Address Comments To:

Content:

(BB, Ab, Ho, Pa, FR, LLL, S, NN, A, DD, MM) Strong moral worldview with a strong moral premise, but containing some immoral R-rated content, including light homosexual references; jokes about New Age religious practices in Hollywood; about 70 obscenities, three strong profanities and seven light profanities; implied fornication, crude sex talk, and references to prostitution; upper female nudity, rear female nudity, and upper male nudity; alcohol; smoking, marijuana use, and other drug references; and, lying, deceit, practical joke backfires, pride, boasting, and jealousy.

GENRE: Satire

BB

Ab

Ho

Pa

FR

LLL

NN

A

DD

MM

S

Summary:

In NEW SUIT, a frustrated screenwriter invents a non-existent script that soon becomes the talk of Hollywood. NEW SUIT is a small, well-photographed independent movie that takes a pungent satirical look at Hollywood and builds to a hilarious climax, but is diminished by a weak ending, strong foul language, and references to sexual immorality and drugs.

Review:

NEW SUIT is a small, well-photographed independent movie that takes a pungent satirical look at the lies and deceit permeating Hollywood. It builds to a hilarious climax that, nevertheless, peters out slightly at the very end.

Jordan Bridges plays a young screenwriter, Kevin, who comes to Los Angeles to make his fortune. He strikes up a romantic relationship with a beautiful young producer, Marianne (played by Marisa Coughlan), who's also trying to make a name for herself. Marianne helps Kevin get a job at Kingdom Pictures reading scripts for one of his idols, director Muster Hansau (played superbly by Dan Hedaya). Two years later, however, Kevin is still stuck in the job, and he and Marianne are no longer together.

One day, during lunch, Kevin gets upset with the superior attitudes of his male lunch buddies, who are wildly praising a particular script even though none of them has probably read it. Kevin invents an imaginary script, "New Suit," that he claims is even better, and praises the screenwriter, Jordan Strawberry, Jordan being the name of the ice cream server Kevin's just visited and Strawberry being the kind of ice cream he's just bought. Not wanting to be upstaged, all of his buddies agree with Kevin about the non-existent script.

Kevin's private little joke comes back to haunt him when everyone around Hollywood suddenly starts talking about the "New Suit" script and Jordan Strawberry, which has mysteriously become Jackson Strawberry. Even the people in his office start talking about them. Things go from bad to worse when Marianne, Kevin's ex-girlfriend, actually tries to sell the script as Jackson Strawberry's agent. Can Kevin save Marianne from herself and from the Hollywood hype machine that has clearly gone out of control?

NEW SUIT starts too slowly but picks up very quickly when everyone in Hollywood begins talking about Kevin's imaginary script. Some of the best, most hilarious, scenes come when Kevin tries to tell some of his friends and colleagues that the script for "New Suit" doesn't exist, but nobody believes him because they are so used to being lied to and cheated in Hollywood. The story reaches a climax when the head of Kingdom Pictures, a Jeffrey Katzenberg look-alike played by Paul McCrane who plays Dr. Romano on TV's ER, tries to broker a deal for the imaginary "New Suit" script to give to Kevin's own boss, who desperately wants to make sure his rival doesn't snatch the script away from him.

NEW SUIT brilliantly captures the lies, deceit, pride, jealousy, and perversion rampant in much of Hollywood. Everyone there is so used to lying and bragging, the movie says, that they refuse to recognize the truth, even when it hits them in the proverbial kisser. Kevin's boss in fact hears about the "New Suit" script from his personal prostitute, who enjoys going around town touting different scripts to all the moguls she services. Everyone in the cast does an excellent job of presenting this biting material, including the two young leads. The movie falters, however, during the denouement that follows the story's climax, which could have used a few more laughs and a stronger moral victory. In the end, Kevin decides that personal integrity is more important than fame and fortune, but his decision also results in him deciding to just leave Hollywood behind him. This decision is not fully satisfying because it seems defeatist and abrupt.

Regrettably, NEW SUIT contains some very strong foul and crude language and references to sex and drugs. It's too bad the filmmakers didn't turn their sharp wit as strongly against these other kinds of wickedness. For, once you decide to travel down the path toward truth and integrity, you can't stop shining a light on all the other ills that surround us in this fallen world.

Thus, although NEW SUIT has some strong moral qualities, it doesn't fully measure up as a positive redemptive work.

Please address your comments to:

Christina N. Zilber and Laurent M. Zilber

Co-Presidents

Trillion Entertainment

650 North Bronson Ave.

Suite 134

Los Angeles, CA 90004

Phone: (323) 871-4456

Fax: (323) 960-4759

Website: www.trillion-ent.com

Email: into@trillion-ent.com

SUMMARY: In NEW SUIT, a frustrated screenwriter invents a non-existent script that soon becomes the talk of Hollywood. NEW SUIT is a small, well-photographed independent movie that takes a pungent satirical look at Hollywood and builds to a hilarious climax, but is diminished by a weak ending, strong foul language, and references to sexual immorality and drugs.

In Brief: