STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE Add To My Top 10

Standard Operating Propaganda

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 25, 2008

Starring: N/A

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 117 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

Director: Errol Morris

Executive Producer: Robert Fernandez

Producer: Errol Morris and Julie Bilson Ahlberg

Writer: None

Address Comments To:

Michael Barker, Tom Bernard and Marcia Bloom
Co-Presidents
Sony Pictures Classics
(Sony Pictures Entertainment)
550 Madison Avenue, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Phone: (212) 833-8833
Fax: (212) 833-8844
Web Page: www.sonyclassics.com
Email: [email protected]

Content:

(HHH, APAPAP, LLL, VVV, SSS, NNN, D, MMM) Very strong humanist worldview with very strong anti-American messages saying that American soldiers are not heroes; 51 obscenities and four profanities; graphic photos, videos and re-enactments of torture and humiliation; “posed” photos of sex and description of sex among soldiers, prisoners forced to masturbate on camera; photos, videos, and re-enactments of naked prisoners including full frontal male nudity; no alcohol; smoking; and, moral relativism, negative role models of American soldiers, criminal acts, and lying.

Summary:

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE is a documentary that presents the filmmaker’s anti-American and anti-military point of view on the humiliation and torture of prisoners in the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. The images are graphic, violent and often sexual, but the filmmaker’s “case” that the humiliation of the Iraqi prisoners was standard procedure by the military is not proved.

Review:

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE is a documentary which presents the filmmaker’s point of view on the humiliation and torture of prisoners in the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Using thousands of photos and videos taken by the MP’s (Military Police) themselves along with re-enactments of events and on-camera interviews, this documentary details the events that brought international attention to the actions of some of the soldiers. The movie’s point of view is that the Iraq War is a “mess,” that America is not honorable, and that American soldiers are not heroes. The filmmaker’s question poised is, are the actions of the indicted soldiers just the actions of a few “bad apples” or are they a part of a “standard operating procedure?”

As the film’s title suggests, the filmmaker says it’s standard operating procedure. Yet even in the movie’s own interviews, this is contradicted. One soldier says that the fact that pictures were taken at all proves that the soldiers didn’t think that what they were doing was wrong. Then, later, another soldier says that when generals and high-ranking officers came to visit, they would “clean up” and not be involved in the humiliation of prisoners until the visitors left. So, which is it? If it’s standard operating procedure that comes from the highest levels of the military and administration, why hide it? Further, when the soldiers are interviewed on camera and describe the events of which they were a part, their “testimony” should be at least accepted on face value. However, the soldiers begin to speak about things beyond their experience, such as what motivates the Pentagon and other government agencies. The soldiers aren’t experts in these areas yet the comments are part of the “plot points” that drive the movie’s narrative.

The actions of the soldiers are unthinkable and irreprehensible. The soldiers seem to delight in taking the photos since they snapped over a thousand while they pose, smile and give a “thumbs up.” The soldiers, many who have served prison sentences for their actions, try to justify themselves by saying they were angry or that everyone was doing it. One of the “stars” of the photos and videos, Lynndie England, says she was young and in love with one of the other soldiers and that’s why she did it.

Content and political issues aside, the documentary is well made. Errol Morris is one of the premier documentary filmmakers working today. However, the movie’s integrity comes into question when actual photos are mixed seamlessly with re-enactments to the point where it’s hard to know which of the images are actually representative of what happened or were staged based on the filmmaker’s direction. Re-enactments are common and acceptable. However, the movie’s premise is that the photos don’t lie and tell the story of Abu Ghraib. It would have been better had the audience been told, even visually on the screen, which photos and videos are real and which are fake.

This movie is difficult to watch because the soldiers captured their appalling actions on film, and the graphics are absolutely horrific. The prisoners appear on camera naked and are forced into humiliating, often sexual, actions. Though not the intention of the movie, this documentary serves to show the depravity of our souls without God and the twisted and inhumane actions we can commit. It’s only because Jesus became a person and died for our dark hearts that we can have right standing with God. And, only because of the new heart that God gives by his grace that when we see the unmentionable actions of these soldiers that we say, “there but by the grace of God go I.” Sadly, Erroll Morris instead uses these events to further his anti-American agenda and paint all American soldiers with a broad brush. Yet, noble, honorable men and women work day in and day out in the military to protect our country. Our hope is that American soldiers will avoid the insult and avoid this movie.

In Brief:

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE is an anti-American documentary that presents the filmmaker’s point of view on the humiliation of prisoners in the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Using thousands of photos and videos taken by the MP’s (Military Police) themselves along with re-enactments of events and on-camera interviews, this documentary details the events that brought international attention to the actions of some soldiers. The movie’s point is that the actions of the indicted soldiers was “standard operating procedure.” However, that argument is never proved in this movie made by Errol Morris.

This movie’s integrity comes into question when actual photos are mixed seamlessly with re-enactments to the point where its hard to know which of the images are actually representative of what happened or were staged based on the filmmakers direction. Re-enactments are common and acceptable. However, the premise is that the photos accurately tell the story of Abu Ghraib. It would have been better had the audience been told, even visually, which photos and videos are real and which are fake. There are horrific images of prisoners being humiliated, full frontal male nudity, sexual images, and much foul language.