BED OF ROSES

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 26, 1996

Starring: Christian Slate, Mary Stuart
Masterson, Pamela Segall, &
Josh Brolin

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience:

Rating: PG

Runtime: 110 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Michael Goldenberg EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Joseph Hartwick &
Lynn Harris

Executive Producer:

Producer: Joseph Hartwick & Lynn
Harris PRODUCERS: Allan
Mindel & Denise Shaw

Writer: Michael Goldenberg

Address Comments To:

Content:

(Ro, L, S, A, M) Romantic worldview where romantic love, family & friendship are idealized; 2 vulgarities; 2 implied sex scenes & sexual molestation implied; alcohol use; and, lying

Summary:

BED OF ROSES is a lighthearted romantic drama giving viewers the ultimate fairy tale of chance meetings, falling in love, and working it out in the end. The film's morality falters with the blatant acceptance of the premarital sex implied in the film. However, this feel-good movie caters to the hopeless romantic in all of us.

Review:

BED OF ROSES is a lighthearted romantic drama giving viewers the ultimate fairy tale of chance meetings, falling in love and working it all out in the end. Work is life for corporate V.P. Lisa (played by Mary Stuart Masterson). She receives notice of the death of her abusive foster father who raised her. In the moment of her grief, a young man named Lewis (played by Christian Slater) happens to pass by her building on a late night walk. He sets himself to find out who she is and to cheer her up. After he anonymously delivers flowers to her the next day, she decides on a whim to visit Lewis' flower shop and learn the identity of her mysterious benefactor. After a few tender and heartfelt exchanges, it looks like the couple is headed for a fine romance. Yet, when she gets cold feet, Lewis rallies to keep her affection as she battles her fear of love, family and emotional intimacy.

BED OF ROSES extols the value of family and good friends, and a major thread throughout the film involves Lisa's attempts to feel comfortable in Lewis' strong, welcoming family after years of both circumstantial and self-imposed alienation. The film's morality falters with the blatant acceptance of the premarital sex implied in the movie. However, this feel-good movie caters to the hopeless romantic who has nothing better to do on Valentine's Day.

In Brief: