BLOW DRY

A Hair-Raising Affair

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 09, 2001

Starring: Alan Rickman, Natasha Richardson, Rachel Griffiths, Rachel Leigh Cook, & Josh Hartnett

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Miramax Films/Disney

Director: Paddy Breathnach

Executive Producer: Moritz Borman & Chris Sievernich

Producer: Ruth Jackson

Writer: Simon Beaufoy

Address Comments To:

Bob & Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
Miramax Films
8439 Sunset Blvd.
West Hollywood, CA 90069
Phone: (323) 822-4100
Website: www.miramax.com

Content:

(RoRo, HoHo, LLL, S, NNN, A, D, M) Romantic worldview with strong homosexual/bisexual content; 26 obscenities, 1 strong profanity, 1 mild profanities, & cancer victim vomits; no violence; implied adultery, two lesbian kissing scenes, lesbians live together, & bisexuality condoned; full female nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, cheating, dirty tricks & revenge.

Summary:

BLOW DRY is the American title of a British comedy called NEVER BETTER about a champion hairstylist, his ex-wife and the ex-wife’s lesbian lover. BLOW DRY tries hard to be a sweet-natured movie, but its sexual politics and some brief but extreme nudity make ultimately are too distasteful.

Review:

BLOW DRY is the American title of a British comedy called NEVER BETTER.

In the story, an English hair stylist, Phil, is living in a small town with his son, Brian, ten years after his wife, Shelley, ran off with Sandra, the female model that he and his wife used to win a series of hair styling competitions. Shelley and Sandra are living together in the same town. Phil now owns a barber shop with his son, Brian, while Shelley and Sandra run a local beauty salon.

Needless to say, Phil and Brian are not on speaking terms with either Shelley or Sandra. Shelley finds out from her doctor, however, that she’s not likely to recover from the cancer wracking her body. When the national hair styling competition comes to their town, Shelley tries to make overtures to Phil and Brian, to see if they can’t just reconcile in time to enter the contest. Not knowing about the cancer, Phil, and even Brian, rebuff Shelley, until Brian becomes irked by the way the current national champion treats his father. Everyone finds out about the status of Shelley’s disease, they enter the contest, Shelley shows that she loves both Phil and Sandra, and the reunited, bisexual family walks off happily ever after at the end of the picture.

BLOW DRY tries hard to be a sweet-natured movie. It is indeed fun to watch the hairstyling contest, and the melodrama regarding the wife’s fatal disease is emotionally resonant, if predictable, but the sexual politics surrounding the wife’s love affair with the female model is distasteful, and not just because it involves the immoral sexual sin of homosexuality. Thus, the movie fails to make the connection between the cancer of Shelley’s disease and the cancer of her sin of abandoning her husband and her young son. It is clear, however, that both she and her lesbian lover suffer from the impact of the cancer. Yet, the suffering is only a momentary emotional one, not a deep spiritual pain, because it gives way to the absurd bisexual motif when Shelley tells Phil that he’s still the only man for her. This, of course, makes a mockery of true marital bliss, the kind that God intended for his human creation.

Adding to this moral lapse is some strong foul language, mostly English obscenities, and full female nudity. The nudity includes a crucial scene of nudity at the movie’s climax, which further taints the whole affair.

In Brief:

BLOW DRY is the American title of a British comedy called NEVER BETTER. In the story, a hairstylist and his son reunites 10 years later with his ex-wife and her lesbian lover, a model, to compete in the national hairstyling championship in England. Complicating matters is the fact that the ex-wife’s doctor has just told her that she’s likely to die from cancer.

BLOW DRY is fun to watch during the hairstyling contest, and the melodrama regarding the wife’s fatal disease is emotionally resonant, if predictable, but the sexual politics surrounding the ex-wife’s love affair with the female model is distasteful, and not just because it involves the immoral sexual sin of homosexuality. The motif of the wife’s abandonment of her husband and her son gives way to an absurd bisexual motif when Shelley tells Phil that she still loves him deeply. This, of course, makes a mockery of true marital bliss, the kind that God intended for his human creation. Adding to this moral lapse is some strong foul language, mostly English obscenities, and full female nudity. The nudity includes a crucial scene of nudity at the movie’s climax, which further taints the whole affair