FIRELIGHT (TV 2012)

Jailhouse Redemption

Content +2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 22, 2012

Starring: Cuba Gooding, Jr., Q’orianka
Kilcher, DeWanda Wise, Sharon
Morris, Maria Howell, Vickie
Eng,

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: TV-PG

Runtime: 97 minutes

Distributor: Hallmark Hall of Fame
productions

Director: Darnell Martin

Executive Producer: Alicia Keys, Susan Lewis, Mary
Martin, Brent Shields

Producer: David Rosemont

Writer: Ligiah Villalobos

Address Comments To:

Brad Moore, President
Hallmark Hall of Fame Productions
12001 Ventura Place, Suite 300
Studio City, CA 91604
Phone: (818) 505-9191
Fax: (818) 505-9842

Content:

(BB, C, H, Ab, Pa, V, DD, MM) Strong moral worldview with light redemptive elements about female prisoners who learn lessons of redemption, sacrifice, forgiveness and heroism, set against immoral prisoners who are gang members within the prison walls, some mild mixed philosophies mentioned from the humanist Voltaire to Socrates but they are used in ways to promote moral lessons; some mild violence includes woman falls and hurts her ankle while running from the police after committing a robbery, female prisoners fight, other inmates are trained in a firefighting program, and they are shown fighting wildfires as well as rescuing a man whose vehicle has fallen into a ravine, flashback shows woman committing a hit-and-run in which the victim dies; no sexuality although a married couple kiss before falling asleep; no nudity; no alcohol use; no drug use although an inmate gang leader attempts to get a new prisoner to deliver some drugs to another inmate; and, some miscellaneous immorality includes threats, bullying, rebellion, and girls share stories of why they are in prison.

Summary:

FIRELIGHT, starring Cuba Gooding, Jr. and produced by Hallmark Hall of Fame, is a well-intentioned, heart-warming character drama. It’s about a group of young female inmates and the moral lessons of forgiveness, sacrifice, heroism and redemption they learn from the man who heads up their detention center.

Review:

FIRELIGHT, starring Cuba Gooding, Jr. and produced by the Hallmark Hall of Fame, is a well-intentioned, heart-warming character drama. It’s about a group of young, female inmates, and the moral lessons of forgiveness, sacrifice, heroism and redemption that they learn from the man who heads up their detention center.

The young women at the detention center have committed crimes ranging from gang-related violence to white-collar, corporate theft, from deadly hit-and-runs to armed robbery. However, D.J. (Cuba Gooding, Jr.), the head of the detention center, doesn’t look at any of them as criminals with no hope of rehabilitation. Instead, what he sees are young women who have a chance to both accept responsibility for their actions as well as gain redemption in order to be integrated back into society.

When a new young inmate named Caroline arrives, D.J. automatically sees something different in her, something that even she refuses to acknowledge. Caroline quickly finds herself thrust between two groups within the prison: a gang of tough women who exist by intimidation, and a group who is part of a prisoner-sponsored fire fighting program, better known as Crew 9.

Crew 9 helps local firefighters with wildfires while learning lessons about teamwork and responsibility. D.J. is so proud of his Crew 9 girls and their rehabilitation rates. He implores Caroline to be a part of it, but she refuses. Instead, she tries to navigate her way through the prison hierarchy on her own. Soon, however, Caroline finds herself the target of the gang's threats. She’s befriended and, ultimately, joins with the girls of Crew 9. There, she finds acceptance and redemption, and even learns lessons of self-sacrifice and heroism.

FIRELIGHT is a simple, honest movie that delivers some very heart-warming moments, especially as the various young women face their individual trials. While the movie focuses mainly on Caroline's character journey, her story has less emotional impact than some of the other character's stories. The movie also has some under-developed stories – especially D.J.'s home life – that could have added some more dynamics to the plot. As it is, however, FIRELIGHT delivers a moral tale, a story of young prisoners who find purpose and redemption. The movie has some mixed philosophies from Socrates to Voltaire as well as mild elements of very light violence and miscellaneous immorality such as threats and bullying, but there’s nothing that requires too much caution, so media-wise audience can enjoy FIRELIGHT for what it offers – an often heart-warming character drama that stresses a morally uplifting attitude.

In Brief:

FIRELIGHT is a TV movie starring Cuba Gooding, Jr. He plays D.J., the head of a detention center for young female criminals. The young women have committed crimes ranging from gang-related violence to white-collar, corporate theft, from deadly hit-and-runs to armed robbery. However, D.J. sees in them a hope for redemption. He encourages a new inmate, Caroline, to get involved in a prisoner-sponsored fire fighting program, better known as Crew 9. At first she refuses and tries to get by on her own. When that fails, she joins Crew 9. There, Caroline finds acceptance and redemption, and even learns lessons of self-sacrifice and heroism.

FIRELIGHT is a simple, honest movie that delivers some very heart-warming moments. However, Caroline’s story is not as interesting as some of the other inmates’ stories. Also, D.J.’s home life could have added more dynamic elements. Even so, FIRELIGHT is an uplifting, absorbing drama that’s worth seeing. It has some mixed philosophies from Socrates and Voltaire, light violence, and some miscellaneous immorality, such as threats and bullying. This content is done in a light, family-friendly manner. So, FIRELIGHT is appropriate viewing for the whole family.