HEIGHTS

Sordid Affairs

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 17, 2005

Starring: Glen Close, Elizabeth Banks,
James Marsden, Jesse Bradford,
John Light, George Segal, Eric
Bogosian, and Andrew Howard

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

Director: Chris Terrio

Executive Producer: Paul Bradley

Producer: Ismail Merchant and Richard
Hawley

Writer: Amy Fox

Address Comments To:

Michael Barker, Tom Bernard and Marcie Bloom
Co-Presidents
Sony Pictures Classics
550 Madison Avenue, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Phone: (212) 833-8833
Web Page: http://www.sonyclassics.com
Email: Sony_Classics@spe.sony.com

Content:

(HH, Ro, HoHoHo, B, LLL, V, SS, N, A, DD, M) Strong humanist worldview with Romantic overtones and very strong homosexual content that says people should be either heterosexual or homosexual and frowns at bisexuality, as well as light moral elements, including scenes with Jewish rabbi, who tries to counsel engaged, live-in interfaith couple wherein the Jewish groom likes Christmas decorations but his gentile girlfriend does not, touching scene between a mother and her daughter, and Jewish wedding scene with a reference to God; 37 obscenities, five strong profanities and three light profanities; mugger stabs man in stomach and ambulance takes man to hospital; no explicit sex scenes, but two men kiss passionately, talk about man’s homosexual lovers, married couple has an “open marriage” but husband has clearly decided to leave his wife for his current mistress, older married woman pursues younger man, and engaged couple lives together; upper male nudity in glamour shots for homosexual photographer’s upcoming art show; alcohol use; smoking and man talks about smoking marijuana with his ex-girlfriend; and, mugger grabs woman’s purse before stabbing her companion, lying and sleazy magazine editor forces homosexual writer to take a sleazy assignment interviewing his famous lover’s former conquests.

Summary:

HEIGHTS is a well-written, but talky, ensemble piece set in New York City about an engaged young couple, the woman’s actress mother who has regrets about her open marriage, a young actor who has caught the mother’s eye, and a young homosexual writer who’s on an assignment that will disrupt the couple’s wedding plans. HEIGHTS has no explicit sex scenes, but its subject matter is pretty sordid and it contains strong foul language and a pro-homosexual, humanist bent.

Review:

HEIGHTS is an ensemble piece loosely based on a short play by Amy Fox and set in New York City. It focuses on a young engaged couple named Jonathan and Isabel who live together, the young woman’s actress mother, Diana, who’s suffering regrets about her open marriage, a young actor named Alec who attracts Diana’s eye, and a young homosexual writer named Peter from London who’s trying to interview the former conquests of his older lover for a Vanity Fair article about his lover, who’s a famous photographer. It turns out that Jonathan was one of the celebrity photographer’s conquests in London and appears in the photographer’s book on his former conquests. He tries to hide this fact from Isabel. Meanwhile, Isabel loses her own photography job, Alec waits for the true love that he really is pining after, Diana is devastated by her husband’s relationship with his new lover, and Peter finds out from his interview subjects what a cad his lover in London really is. Another secret about Jonathan will have further affects on his upcoming marriage with Isabel and force Isabel’s mother to discover what’s most important to her.

The subject matter in HEIGHTS is pretty sordid, but there are no explicit sex scenes. There is, however, a passionate homosexual kiss, as well as some semi-nude male photos and plenty of strong foul language. The movie also makes it explicit, in a scene with a Jewish rabbi, that Isabel and Jonathan are not religious, even though Jonathan is Jewish. Thus, the movie has a strong atheist humanist worldview with a very strong pro-homosexual message. It clearly sides with Jonathan coming out of the closet and ending his planned marriage to Isabel, though the movie is not strident about it.

In reality, of course, atheism and homosexuality ultimately lead to narcissism and nihilism. People who succumb to them can never be truly nice people. Movies like HEIGHTS that casually accept atheism and homosexuality usually don’t make much money and hopefully never will.

In Brief:

HEIGHTS is an ensemble piece set in New York City. It focuses on a young engaged couple named Jonathan and Isabel who live together. It also concerns Isabel’s actress mother, Diana, who has regrets about her open marriage, a young actor named Alec who attracts Diana’s eye, and a young homosexual writer named Peter from London who’s trying to interview the former conquests of his older lover for an article about his lover, who’s a famous photographer. It turns out that Jonathan was one of the celebrity photographer’s conquests in London and appears in the photographer’s new book of former conquests.

The subject matter in HEIGHTS is pretty sordid, but it is not explicit. There is, however, a passionate homosexual kiss, as well as some semi-nude male photos and plenty of strong foul language. The movie also makes it clear, in a scene with a Jewish rabbi, that Isabel and Jonathan are not religious, even though Jonathan is Jewish. Thus, the movie has a strong atheist humanist worldview with a very strong pro-homosexual message. Though not strident, it clearly sides with Jonathan coming out of the closet and ending his planned marriage to Isabel.