HURRICANE SEASON Add To My Top 10

True Grace

Content -1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 15, 2010

Starring: Narrated by Terry Bradshaw

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 89 minutes

Distributor: TBD

Director: Franklin Martin

Executive Producer: Terry Bradshaw, Stan Cassio and Reggie Bush

Producer: Franklin Martin

Writer: Franklin Martin

Address Comments To:

Franklin Martin
DUTCHMEN FILMS
500 N Rossmore Ave Suite 201
Los Angeles, CA 90004
Telephone: (310) 691-4721
Website: http://www.walkingondeadfish.com/
E-Mail: franklin@dutchmenfilms.com

Content:

(CCC, BBB, LL, V) Very strong Christian, biblical worldview about fallen people trying to get their lives together after Hurricane Katrina; 16 obscenities and two profanities; light football violence and lots of shots of hurricane devastation; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, nothing else objectionable.

Summary:

HURRICANE SEASON: WALKING ON DEAD FISH is a documentary about the effects of Hurricane Katrina on some high school football players, narrated by football legend Terry Bradshaw. WALKING ON DEAD FISH is so well crafted that it could have been a drama. Writer/Director Franklin Martin builds a tremendous story of Christian faith and values, but there is some salty language.

Review:

HURRICANE SEASON: WALKING ON DEAD FISH is one of the best documentaries ever made. It is so well crafted that it could have been a drama. The editing is superb!

Narrated by football legend Terry Bradshaw, the movie examines the impact of Hurricane Katrina from the point of view of the high school football players in New Orleans whose only hope in life was a football scholarship. When Katrina destroyed their homes and their schools, the chance for any scholarships seems to have vanished. One nearby school, however, expands its football program to take in the displaced students.

The hero of the school football team is an African American boy named Stanley whose family is barely surviving. One of the displaced players is a white boy named Johnny, who is faster and better than anyone else on the team. When Coach Larry starts replacing Stanley with Johnny, their team starts winning for the first time in the team’s history. Stanley has to confront his envy and takes refuge in playing music at his Christian Pentecostal church. The team is all black except for Johnny and another player.

From this volatile mix, Writer/Director Franklin Martin builds a tremendous story of Christian faith and values. Jerry Bruckheimer of REMEMBER THE TITANS could have scripted the way that the season develops, except this is a documentary. In spite of its Christian content and Stanley’s re-discovery of his faith, the movie has real life, salty obscene language and upper male nudity in locker shots. It also has prayer, praise, great music, and a faithful storyline.

HURRICANE SEASON: WALKING ON DEAD FISH was screened a person who dislikes documentaries. By the end, they said this is one of the best movies they’ve ever seen. It is just that good.

In Brief:

HURRICANE SEASON: WALKING ON DEAD FISH is a documentary about the effects of Hurricane Katrina, narrated by football legend Terry Bradshaw. The movie examines Katrina’s impact from the viewpoint of some high school football players in New Orleans whose only hope in life was a football scholarship. When Katrina destroyed their homes and their schools, the chance for the scholarships seems to have vanished. One nearby school, however, expands its football program to take in the displaced students. The hero of the school football team is an African American boy named Stanley, whose family is barely surviving. When Coach Larry starts replacing Stanley with Johnny, one of the displaced players who’s white but is faster and better, Stanley has to confront his envy and take refuge in playing music at his Christian Pentecostal church.

WALKING ON DEAD FISH is so well crafted that it could have been a drama. Writer/Director Franklin Martin builds a tremendous story of Christian faith and values. Despite the Christian content, the movie has real life, salty obscene language and upper male nudity in locker shots. But, it also has prayer, praise, great music, and a faithful storyline.