INDIGO Add To My Top 10

Dangerous New Age Claptrap

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 28, 2005

Starring: Neale Donald Walsch and Meghan McCandless

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 89 minutes

Distributor: Monterey Media, Inc.

Director: Stephen Simon

Executive Producer: James Twyman

Producer: Neale Donald Walsch

Writer: James Twyman and Neale Donald Walsch

Address Comments To:

Monterey Media Inc.
566 St. Charles Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
Phone: 1-800-424-2593
Fax: (805) 496-0601
Website: www.montereymedia.com
Email: [email protected]

Content:

(PaPaPa, OOO, E, B, Ab, LLL, V, S, A, DD, M) Very strong New Age pagan worldview with very strong occult content, including psychic girl communicates with dead person, uses telepathy, has premonitions, predicts the future, heals people, and manipulates non-psychic people, and some New Age environmentalism, as well as some moral elements extolling family, inner peace and love, marred by anti-Christian content where belief in the Devil is mocked; at least 26 obscenities, four strong profanities and two light profanities; some light violence such as police make a drug bust, man carries gun for protection and young man threatens people with gun; implied fornication and a couple sexual innuendoes; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking and illegal drug dealing; and, woman says there are “a million paths to God,” talk about angels and fairies and luck, and lying.

Summary:

INDIGO is a New Age movie about an occult phenomenon called “indigo children,” a group of allegedly gifted psychic children who, some New Agers believe, will lead the world into a new age of love and harmony, in a story about a young indigo child who uses her psychic powers to help her grandfather re-connect with his two children. INDIGO, which is now on DVD, has a very strong New Age worldview with dangerous occult content and a surprising amount of foul language.

Review:

INDIGO is a New Age movie about an occult phenomenon called “indigo children,” a group of allegedly psychic children who, some New Agers believe, will lead the world into a new age of love and harmony. In the movie’s story, Cheryl, the estranged daughter of a failed development tycoon, asks her father, Ray, to protect her young daughter, Grace, from her drug-dealing husband. Cheryl is in prison after taking a drug rap for her escaped husband. The husband thinks that Cheryl has hidden the missing $50,000 from the drug bust, and that Grace may know something about it.

Ray is reluctant to get involved with his daughter’s problems, but, when he visits Grace at the children’s home where she now lives, he thinks his daughter’s husband is lurking in a car hanging around the home. Ray takes off with Grace out the back, and, on the road in his beat-up car, Ray discovers that Grace has special psychic powers that help her tell the future. A precocious child wise beyond her years, Grace is also able to communicate telepathically with other psychic children, and with the dead mother of a young woman they meet along the way. Grace is also working behind the scenes to manipulate her broken family into re-connecting. Under Grace’s guidance, Ray’s conflicts with his estranged daughter and son are resolved.

INDIGO expresses some positive moral values regarding love and family, but it has a very strong New Age pagan worldview with very strong occult content. At one point, Grace is even compared to Hermione, one of the heroic witches in the HARRY POTTER books. In another scene, the mother of another indigo child says that there are “a million paths to God,” and only some of those paths are religious. Of course, this syncretistic New Age worldview is false, deceptive and abhorrent.

Despite an attempt to provide family-friendly entertainment, INDIGO contains many obscenities and some strong profanities. There are also a few crude sexual innuendoes regarding Ray and his much-younger girlfriend.

Do not be fooled, therefore, by the innocuous aspects of New Age cultural artifacts like INDIGO. They may mimic family values, and sometimes even Christian values, but they have a demonic character. On that note, it is important to remember that New Age cults, like other cults, try to possess a veneer of plausibility and moral/spiritual truth in order to seduce people into joining. The best way to expose these cults is to examine and study the Holy Scriptures, like the Bereans in Acts. 17:11.

In Brief:

INDIGO is a New Age movie about an occult phenomenon called “indigo children,” allegedly gifted psychic children who, some New Agers believe, will lead the world into a new age of love and harmony. In the movie’s story, Ray, the estranged grandfather of a gifted young girl, Grace, takes off with her on a life-changing road trip, to escape her drug-dealing father. On the road, Ray discovers that Grace has special psychic powers that help her tell the future. A precocious child wise beyond her years, Grace is also able to communicate telepathically with other psychic children. Under her guidance, Ray changes his life and re-connects with his family, including his estranged son and daughter, Grace’s mother.

INDIGO expresses some positive moral values regarding love and family, but it has a very strong New Age pagan worldview with very strong occult content. Of course, this New Age worldview is false, deceptive and abhorrent. Despite its attempt to provide family-friendly entertainment, INDIGO contains many obscenities and some strong profanities. There are also a few crude sexual innuendoes regarding Ray and his much-younger girlfriend. Thus, INDIGO is not as family-friendly as it pretends to be.