JENNIFER EIGHT Add To My Top 10

Content -2
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Andy Garcia, Uma Thurman, Lance Henriksen, Kathy Baker, Graham Beckel, Kevin Conway, & John Malkovich.

Genre: Mystery thriller

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 120 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Director: Bruce Robinson

Executive Producer:

Producer: Bruce Robinson

Writer: Gary Lucchesi & David Wimbury

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Content:

(LLL, VV, S, N) At least 30 obscenities & 7 profanities; graphic violence in fight scenes; implied sexual immorality but nothing shown; and, semi-nude side view of female body.


Summary:

JENNIFER EIGHT is a suspense thriller about a theoretical serial killer who preys on blind girls. Police have given the name of "Jennifer" to the girls' composite police station mock up of the victims. Breathtaking cinematography and good acting are negated by an abundance of foul language and the fact that the film needs considerable editing to make it tighter.


Review:

JENNIFER EIGHT is a suspense thriller about a theoretical serial killer who preys on blind girls; police have given the name of "Jennifer" to the girls' composite police station mock up of the victims. Police detective John Berlin questions the sole witness in the latest case involving the disappearance of a blind girl's roommate. Berlin finds himself increasingly drawn to Helena (the blind woman), and after she is attacked in her apartment, he provides more protection for her. The case takes a surprising turn at the end of the film.
The cinematography in JENNIFER EIGHT is breathtaking and gives the viewer a sense of involvement and immediacy with the characters. The acting, too, is commendable--especially on the part of Uma Thurman who plays Helena with sensitivity and vulnerability. The movie contains several Gothic elements like the deserted institute for the blind with its dark, labyrinthine hallways and rusty fire escapes situated in a bleak, mountainous region of California, and of course, the interesting dimension of Helena's blindness which causes her to rely solely on her sense of hearing to report as a witness. Unfortunately, the film contains an abundance of foul language and shadow nudity, and needs considerable editing to make it tighter. For example, the interrogation scenes tend to drag and the dialogue becomes somewhat stilted which takes away from the film's believability.


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