KAVI Add To My Top 10

Set My People Free

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Release Date: February 19, 2010

Starring: Sagar Salunke, Ulhas Tayade, Rajesh Kumar, Madhavi Juvekar, Debu Bhattacharya, Rishi Raj Singh, and Mukesh Bharti

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 19 minutes

Distributor: Magnolia Pictures

Director: Gregg Helvey

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Gregg Helvey, Gunee T. Monga and Harishi Amin

Writer: Gregg Helvey

Address Comments To:

Gregg Helvey
Email: [email protected]
or
Bill Banowski, CEO, Magnolia Pictures
1614 West 5th St.
Austin, TX 78703
Eamon Bowles, President, Magnolia Pictures
43 West 27th St., 7th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 924-6701; Fax: (212) 924-6742
Website: www.magpictures.com; Email: info@ magpictures.com

Content:

(BBB, V, M) Extremely moral worldview exposing the evils of current slavery; no foul language; slave master beats boy, slave owner slaps boy, and boy bleeds a little trying to get out of shackles; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, slavery but it is rebuked.

Summary:

KAVI is an Oscar-nominated short drama about a little boy in India who tries to escape the clutches of a slave master who has indentured the boy’s father for a specious debt. KAVI is a short, heart-rending, and captivating movie that exposes India’s evil slavery system, the evil fruit of Hinduism.

Review:

There are millions of slaves in the world today. One of the largest groups, outside of the prostitution trade, are the untouchables and other impoverished groups in India. When these people owe money to unscrupulous lenders, they often are forced to become slaves.

There have been several excellent documentaries about this awful problem, but nothing captures the emotional power of the situation like a narrative movie. KAVI is such a powerful narrative movie.

Nominated for an Oscar this year for best live action short film, KAVI is the story of a little boy whose father is an indentured slave because he owes money to the slave master. Kavi is the fastest worker among the brick-making slaves. He even pushes his father to go faster, because he thinks it is a game.

One day his eyes wander, and he looks at a group of students playing cricket. His father tells him that some children work and some go to school. He gets beaten by the slave master’s thug for being distracted.

As a punishment, he is given a much tougher job of cleaning up the broken bricks. When he is finished, Kavi sees some welfare workers interviewing the slaves in a hidden spot to try to help them get free. He leaves the brick factory to get a drink from the welfare workers. When found, he gets beaten again.

The next day, a cricket ball lands at his feet. When he hands it back to the schoolboys, he gets beaten ruthlessly by the slave master and locked in shackles.

Soon, his parents are carted off to a new brick factory. His existence is in jeopardy.

KAVI is a short, heart-rending movie. It is very well structured. Every aspect of the movie is elegant and compelling. It moves rapidly and captures and holds the viewer’s attention. It deserves the awards it has received.

Most people do not have access to movies like this or THE STONING OF SORAYA M. and therefore have no idea of the night and day difference between Christianity and these other religions. The more you study and the more you observe Hinduism, Islam, paganism, socialism, communism, and the other religions and ideologies, the more you cannot but help conclude that Christianity is the greatest blessing that has come to mankind, if you receive the free gift of salvation from Jesus Christ and joyously consider the words of Paul in Galatians 3:28: “There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”

KAVI is being shown in various cities in the United States as part of a program of Oscar-nominated shorts. The screenings begin on Feb. 19, 2010, so check your local theater listings or go to the movie’s website at kavithemovie.com for these and other screenings.

In Brief:

KAVI is an Oscar-nominated short drama about a little boy in India whose father is an indentured slave because he owes a specious debt to the slave master. Kavi is the fastest worker among the brick-making slaves. One day his eyes wander, and he looks at a group of students playing cricket. The warden beats him. Given a much tougher job of gathering broken bricks, Kavi sees some welfare workers interviewing the slaves to try to help them. He gets beaten again for talking to them. The next day, a cricket ball lands at his feet. When he hands it back to the schoolboys, he gets beaten ruthlessly and locked in shackles. His parents are carted off to a new brick factory. Kavi’s existence is in jeopardy.

There are millions of slaves in the world today. One of the largest groups, outside of prostitution, are the untouchables in India. KAVI is a short, heart-rending movie that exposes India’s evil slavery system. It also exposes the moral bankruptcy of Hinduism the major religion in India. Every aspect of KAVI is elegant and compelling. It moves rapidly and holds the viewer’s attention.