MIGHTY FINE

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Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 25, 2012

Starring: Chazz Paliminteri, Andie
MacDowell, Jodelle Ferland,
Rainey Qualley

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 80 minutes

Distributor: Adopt Films

Director: Debbie Goodstein-Rosenfeld

Executive Producer: Chazz Palminteri, Mark Manuel

Producer: Ajae Clearway, Katheryn
Wallack, Debbie
Goodstein-Rosenfeld

Writer: Debbie Goodstein-Rosenffeld

Address Comments To:

Tim Grady and Jeff Lipsky
Adopt Films
2-01 50th Avenue, Suite 29J
Long Island City, NY 11101
Phone: (718) 392-2783
Website: www.adptfilms.net

Content:

(HHH, B, C, LLL, VV, S, N, A, D, MM) Very strong, but not didactic, humanistic worldview, with cultural ties to Judaism and mentions of Christianity but no practice thereof; at least 23 obscenities (including nine “f” words) and 17 profanities; father shoots gun at children to scare them, father tries to run over his daughter in the car, father puts gun to his head in attempts to commit suicide but does not, father almost has a man killed by the Mafia but decides not to, mentions of violence, and father slaps his daughter; implied sex inside of marriage; upper male nudity, rear male nudity, girl in scantily clad clothes, girl in bikini; alcohol use; smoking but no drug use; and, daughter talks back to father, dysfunctional family, father deals with rage and takes it out on family, daughters say they hate their father, depression.

Summary:

MIGHTY FINE shows the repercussions of anger and how a family stays together in the midst of a breakdown by the head of the household, the father. MIGHTY FINE is a depressing movie. It mentions cultural ties to Judaism, but it contains lots of foul language and the characters never rely on or ask God for help in times of trials.

Review:

MIGHTY FINE is a depressing tale of a family trying to learn how to cope with the problems of the day. MIGHTY FINE references cultural ties to religion but no actual practice of it.



Joe Fine has two girls and a beautiful Israeli wife and Holocaust survivor, Stella. Trying to get a new start, the family moves down to Louisiana to be close to Joe’s blouse factory from Brooklyn. The eldest daughter, Maddie, a senior in high school, naturally doesn’t to make the move and is resistant, but the family is trying to stay positive. Moving into a beautiful huge mansion in New Orleans after being in cramped Brooklyn, the family starts to smile a bit more.



Feeling like he has worked his way up in life, Joe is pleased with the house, his beautiful family, and the prospects of a highly successful company. Everything seems to be getting better for the Fine family, but all is shaken when Joe finds out his company is not getting the deal he wanted so much. He impulsively loans money from what appears to be a Mafia man.



All this stress and worries mount on Joe, and he starts to take it out on his family with uncontrollable rage. Wishing he would get help, his family takes him to his old doctor, but of course Joe charms the doctor into believing everything is well. Joe’s rage gets even worse, but eventually the family is able to get him the help he needs.



When it comes down to it, MIGHTY FINE is not a happy go lucky film, but rather sad. The family tries to be happy but with no presented means to get there. There are comments about cultural ties to religion, but there is no practice of religion and no presentation of hope in God. This leads to a rather humanistic worldview. The only means to happiness found is when the father’s put into an institution.



MIGHTY FINE is what you would expect from too many independent movies. It’s slower, the direction is boring, and there are weird voiceovers with a sad undertone. The plotline isn’t very exciting. Nor is it a plotline that people tend to want to see: a father who deals with rage and must learn to cope before he hurts his family. The acting was the best part.



MIGHTY FINE has a humanist worldview, although it mentions a religious cultural background. Though they mention Christianity and Judaism, the characters don’t ask God for help and don’t apply any religious (much less biblical) solutions to their problems. The family stays together, but the movie depicts a painful world with no clear sign of hope. MIGHTY FINE also includes plenty of strong foul language, so extreme caution is advised.

In Brief:

MIGHTY FINE shows the repercussions of anger and how a family stays together in the midst of it. Joe Fine has a lovely family with two daughters and a beautiful Israeli wife and Holocaust survivor. Trying to start again on a new foot, the family moves down to Louisiana to be close to Joe’s blouse factory from Brooklyn. The eldest daughter, Maddie, a senior in high school, naturally doesn’t to make the move and is resistant. The family tries to stay positive. After moving into a beautiful huge mansion in New Orleans, the family starts to smile a bit more. However, when a business deal goes south, Joe starts to take out his anger on his family.

MIGHTY FINE is a slow independent movie with a depressing plotline. The characters mention cultural ties to Judaism but don’t practice any faith. They don’t ask God for help and don’t apply any religious (much less biblical) solutions to their problems. The family stays together, but the movie depicts a painful world with no clear sign of hope. MIGHTY FINE also includes plenty of strong foul language, so extreme caution is advised.