MONEY FOR NOTHING

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 10, 1993

Starring: John Cusack & Michael Madsen

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 95 minutes

Distributor: Buena Vista Pictures

Director: Roman Menendez

Executive Producer:

Producer: EXECUTIVEPRODUCER: David
Permut, Gordon Freedman &
Matthew Tolmach

Writer: Roman Menendez, Tom Musca, &
Carol Sobieski

Address Comments To:

Content:

(LLL, V, SSS, NNN, A/D, M) 34 obscenities, 4 profanities & several vulgarities; brief violence in form of short gunfire & a man beats his adult son with a belt; one scene of graphic fornication with male & female nudity & another scene of woman in underwear; alcohol consumption; and, deception, theft & reference to gambling.

Summary:

MONEY FOR NOTHING stars John Cusack and is based on the true story of an unemployed South Philadelphia man who actually finds $1.2 million, but spends the next five days losing it and going to jail. As far as directing and photography, the film is mediocre. The enjoyment factor is far below that.

Review:

What should you do if you find $1.2 million in cash lying unattended on a deserted street? Well, don't do any of the same things Joey Coyle did and don't bother going to see this movie. MONEY FOR NOTHING stars John Cusack and is based on the true story of an unemployed South Philadelphia man who actually finds $1.2 million, but spends the next five days losing it and going to jail.

The only real truth in this film comes from the lips of a mobster Joey enlists to help launder the money, who says, "The most important question to ask about money is: Do I own the money, or does it own me?" Obviously, the money owns Joey, as he goes against the law and the advice of family and friends to keep the cash. In a nutshell, he knows better, but he wants the wealth and allows greed to control his judgment. In the end, he pays the price and loses everything. The acting performances are less than memorable, and the entire film is quite predictable. The best technical aspect of the film is the authenticity of the characters' South Philly accents. As far as directing and photography, the film is mediocre. The enjoyment factor is far below that. MONEY FOR NOTHING is not humorous, so it cannot be called a comedy. Neither is it dramatic or suspenseful. Maybe we should just call it dull.

In Brief: