SAVING SARAH CAIN

Back to the Simple Life

Content +4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 19, 2007

Starring: Lisa Pepper, Elliott Gould,
Abigail Mason, Soren Fulton,
Danielle Chuchran, Tess
Harper, Tanner Maguire, Bailee
Madison, Tom Tate, and
Jennifer O’Dell

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: TV-PG

Runtime:

Distributor: Fox Faith/Lifetime TV/News
Corp.

Director: Michael Landon, Jr.

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Michael Landon, Jr., Brian
Bird and Robert Gros

Writer: Brian Bird and Cindy Kelley

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman/CEO of News Corp.
Peter Chernin, President/COO of The Fox Group
Tom Rothman and Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen/CEO
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(CCC, BBB, V, M) Very strong Christian worldview with very strong moral elements; no foul language; very slight threats of violence and a sub-plot about a high school wrestling team; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, lying rebuked, using people rebuked, greed rebuked, prayer extolled, the Amish faith promoted, Christianity promoted.

Summary:

In SAVING SARAH CAIN, a TV movie, a young burned-out reporter must decide what kind of life she wants when she suddenly has to take care of her Amish sister’s five children. SAVING SARAH CAIN is a compelling, heart-rending movie that will make audiences want to return to the plain life.

Review:

Sarah Cain is a burned-out young reporter who once upon a time had an advice column in 500 newspapers but is now relegated to an intermittent column in a Portland, Ore. paper. Her publisher, Bill, played wonderfully by Elliott Gould, confronts her for her lackluster stories. He is ready to replace her with the next young reporter to come along. Her boyfriend, Brian, is about to propose to her when she gets a call from her niece, Libby, that her sister Ivy died two days ago.

Sarah flies to Lancaster, Pennsylvania to be a fish out of water at an Amish funeral. Of course, in the midst of the funeral, her cell phone rings and the Amish are not amused, to say the least.

At the gathering after the funeral, the local government social worker, who the Amish call the English, as they refer to all outsiders, shows up and tells her if she does not take care of her five nieces and nephews, the state will put them in foster homes. Thus, Sarah is compelled to bring the five children back to Portland.

Unbeknownst to the children, Sarah starts writing about them. Suddenly, her column takes off. This becomes a tragic problem, because the Amish do not like publicity. So, Sarah is faced with her own duplicity and a struggle to determine what kind of a life she wants to live. The children, who fear the influence of the English society, want to return home. Near tragedy strikes, and decisions must be made.

SAVING SARAH CAIN has a very good storyline. Whereas most movies promote immorality in the face of the stuffiness of moral order, this movie shows the joy and security of morality and, as they call it, the plain life. One would have to have a very hard heart indeed not to want to go back to the community portrayed in this TV movie. The production values are quite good, although the Sarah Cain character is not as warm and sympathetic as she could be and some of the acting is weak. Otherwise, SAVING SARAH CAIN is a compelling, heart-rending movie that will make audiences want to return to the plain life.

In Brief:

In SAVING SARAH CAIN, the title character is a burned-out young reporter who once had an advice column in 500 newspapers but is now relegated to an intermittent column in a Portland, Ore. paper. Her publisher, Bill, played wonderfully by Elliott Gould, confronts her for her lackluster stories. When Sarah’s Amish sister, Ivy dies, Sarah must take care of her five nephews and nieces. The children, who fear the influence of the English society, want to return home. Near tragedy strikes, and decisions must be made.

SAVING SARAH CAIN has a wonderful storyline. Whereas most movies promote immorality in the face of the stuffiness of moral order, this movie shows the joy and security of morality…the plain life. One would have to have a very hard heart not to want to go back to the community portrayed in this TV movie. The production values are quite good, although the Sarah Cain character is not as sympathetic as she could be, and some of the acting is weak. Otherwise, SAVING SARAH CAIN is a compelling, heart-rending movie that will make audiences want to return to the plain Christian life.