SON OF THE MASK Add To My Top 10

Misguided Cartoony Sequel

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 18, 2005

Starring: Jamie Kennedy, Alan Cumming, Traylor Howard, and Bob Hoskins

Genre: Comedy/Action

Audience: Children and young teenagers

Rating: PG for action, crude and
suggestive humor, and language

Runtime: 86 minutes

Address Comments To:

Mark Ordesky, President
Fine Line Features
Robert Shaye and Michael Lynne
Co-Chairman/Co-CEO
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd.
Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811
Fax: (310) 854-1453
Web Page: www.flf.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, FRFR, OO, B, L, VV, S, A, D, M) Very strong pagan worldview with strong false religious content based on North myth in story about mythological Norse gods who live in space but come to earth to retrieve a magical mask, with occult incantations and possessions, plus a minor theme about familial reconciliation; eight light obscenities and two light profanities; frequent cartoon violence enacted by realistic-looking computer animation includes man turning into vicious monster, baby and dog try to blow up each other, man’s face floats off his head, monster shoots at guards but purposely misses them, baby’s head spins around and spews green vomit (intended as funny), explosions, and monster throws fireball; man boldly ogles woman’s cleavage, babies shoot out from between woman’s legs, some sexual references, and man and wife procreate off-screen; no nudity; brief alcohol use; brief shot of cigars; and, stealing and lying about identity.

Summary:

SON OF THE MASK is technically a sequel to the 1994 Jim Carrey movie, but Jamie Kennedy plays Tim Avery, a struggling animator trying to balance family and ambition. He finds a mask that turns him into a living cartoon character. The movie suffers from an uncomfortable false religious plotline and some extremely crude jokes.

Review:

SON OF THE MASK is technically a sequel to the 1994 movie, but this new version for children and perhaps new parents bears little resemblance to the Jim Carrey vehicle. Jamie Kennedy plays Tim Avery, a struggling animator trying to balance family and ambition. His dog finds a magical mask that turns its wearer into a living cartoon character, and Tim uses it to make a big splash at work.

After Tim and his wife conceive a child while he is wearing the mask (the audience presumes), their child is born with special powers. Meanwhile, Loki, the son of a god (the movie deals heavily in mythological Norse gods) is roaming the earth to find the mask. Tim’s dog has buried it in the backyard, but Loki won’t rest until he has it back.

If the plot sounds harebrained, you are exactly right. The story only gets in the way of the frequent computer animations. Tim’s dog and baby are animated, the latter looking like a cousin of the dancing baby made popular through ALLY MCBEAL and websites in the late 90s. There is a lot of Wile E. Coyote-style action with chases and outlandish traps.

Although mythology is often studied harmlessly by schoolchildren, in SON OF THE MASK these Norse gods are presented as living, breathing characters, and to confuse the idea of deity is unhealthy for any young person. The gods perform rituals and possess humans, further adding to the uncomfortable false religious feeling of the movie.

Another strange decision is the adult elements haphazardly tossed into the movie. If kids are the target audience, why include a visual gag in which a woman in stirrups has babies shooting out from between her legs? That kind of crudity is inappropriate for the audience.

Crude, irreverent and boring – it’s an easy decision. SON OF THE MASK isn’t worth seeing.

In Brief:

SON OF THE MASK is technically a sequel to the 1994 Jim Carrey movie, but Jamie Kennedy plays Tim Avery, a struggling animator trying to balance family and ambition. His dog finds a magical mask that turns its wearer into a living cartoon character, and Tim uses it to make a big splash at work. When Tim and his wife have a child, Tim quickly sees that his baby has special powers like those from the mask. Meanwhile, Loki, the son of a Norse god (the movie deals heavily in mythological gods) is roaming the earth to find the mask. Tim’s dog buried it in the backyard, but Loki won’t rest until he gets it back.

This plot is harebrained and gets in the way of the frequent computer animations. There is a lot of Wile E. Coyote-style action with chases and outlandish traps. The Norse gods are presented as living, breathing characters, who perform rituals and possess humans, adding to the uncomfortable false religious feeling of the movie. There are also some crude jokes that will go over children’s heads. Crude, irreverent, boring – it’s an easy decision. SON OF THE MASK isn’t worth seeing.