THE CALL

Intense Life and Death Struggle

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 15, 2013

Starring: Halle Berry, Abigail Breslin,
Morris Chestnut, Michael
Eklund, Denise Dowse, Roma
Maffia, Evie Thompson

Genre: Thriller

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 95 minutes

Distributor: TriStar Pictures/Sony Pictures
Entertainment

Director: Brad Anderson

Executive Producer: Guy J. Louthan, Phil Cohen,
William Gallo

Producer: Robert Stein, Jeff Graup,
Michael Helfant, Bradley
Gallo, Michael Luisi, Dale
“Chip” Rosenbloom

Writer: Richard D’Ovidio

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, CEO/Co-Chairman

Amy Pascal, Co-Chairman

Jeff Blake, Vice Chairman, Sony Pictures Entertainment (Columbia Pictures/FilmDistrict/TriStar/Screen Gems/Affirm Films/Provident Films)

10202 West Washington Blvd.

Culver City, CA  90232-3195

Phone:  (310) 244-4000; Fax:  (310) 244-2626

Web Page:  www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(BB, Ab, LLL, VVV, S, A, DD, MM) Strong moral worldview stressing fighting back against evil, marred or diminished by a revenge moment and other content; 11 obscenities, two strong profanities, and 14 light profanities; brief extreme violence and plenty of intense violence and violent situations such as villain starts to cut restrained teenage girl’s forehead, villain repeatedly stabs man with screwdriver, villain sets another man on fire and man on fire twirls around for a few seconds, villain hits man with shovel, villain binds teenage girl, villain puts kidnapped girl in trunk, villain threatens girl’s life with screwdriver, villain tears off girl’s blouse to reveal her bra, villain tied up at one point, etc.; teenage heroine’s friend talks euphemistically about sex, and villain has disturbing fetish/fixation with dead girl he knew when he was younger and her blonde hair; no nudity, but villain takes off teenage girl’s blouse to reveal her bra; no depicted alcohol use, but a reference to drinking; no smoking but villain drugs his victims and prescription pill bottles shown and teenage girl makes a reference to boyfriend smoking too much “dope,” plus a 9-1-1 call mentions taking an overdose of something; and, kidnapping, killer breaks into house, and movie promotes revenge and vigilante justice in one scene.

Summary:

THE CALL stars Halle Berry as a traumatized 9-1-1 operator in Los Angeles who tries to save a teenage girl from the clutches of a disturbed serial killer. THE CALL is a riveting, though straightforward, thriller, with a strong moral viewpoint. However, there’s a scene of revenge, some strong foul language, bloody and intense violence, and disturbing elements.


Review:

THE CALL stars Halle Berry as a 9-1-1 operator trying to save a teenage girl kidnapped by a serial killer. THE CALL is a riveting thriller but there’s plenty of strong foul language, bloody violence, and disturbing situations. There’s also a promotion of revenge at one point.

Halle Berry plays Jordan Turner, a 9-1-1 operator traumatized by a failed encounter with a serial killer after Jordan made a mistake with the teenage caller the killer was attacking. Jordan feels guilty about the caller’s murder, so now she just trains other 9-1-1 recruits.

One day, the killer kidnaps another teenage girl and puts her in a car trunk. The girl, Casey, has a hidden cell phone with her and calls 9-1-1. She gets a newbie operator who can’t handle the call, so Jordan takes over. Thus begins an excruciating situation. If Jordan makes another big mistake, Casey could lose her life.

THE CALL has a lull in the second act, but once it gets going again, it keeps viewers on the edge of their seats. It’s a pretty straightforward thriller, however, so there’s not much depth or profundity. That said, it has a satisfying, riveting ending with a strong moral worldview that stresses fighting back against evil. These positive qualities are diminished by some strong foul language, bloody and intense violence, and disturbing elements and situations. Also, one scene promotes revenge and vigilante justice. So, extreme caution is warranted for Halle Berry’s THE CALL.

In Brief:

THE CALL stars Halle Berry as Jordan Turner, a 9-1-1 operator in Los Angeles. A failed encounter over the phone with a serial killer traumatized Jordan. Jordan feels guilty about a mistake she made, so she now just trains other 9-1-1 recruits. One day, the killer kidnaps another teenage girl. He puts her in a car trunk. The girl, Casey, has a hidden cell phone in her pocket and calls 9-1-1. She gets a newbie operator who can’t handle the call, so Jordan takes over. This begins lengthy, excruciating situation. If Jordan makes another mistake, Casey could lose her life.



THE CALL is a riveting thriller. It keeps viewers on the edge of their seats. It’s a fairly straightforward thriller, however, so there’s not much depth or profundity. That said, it has a satisfying, riveting ending with a strong moral worldview. These positive qualities are diminished by some strong foul language, brief bloody and extremely intense violence, and disturbing elements and situations. Also, one scene promotes revenge and vigilante justice. So, extreme caution is warranted for Halle Berry’s THE CALL.