THE GREAT RAID Add To My Top 10

Inspiring Patriotic Portrait

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 12, 2005

Starring: Benjamin Bratt, Joseph Fiennes, James Franco, Connie Nielsen, and Marton Csokas

Genre: War Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: R for strong war violence and
brief language

Runtime: 120 minutes

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
Miramax Films
375 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10013
Phone: (323) 822-4100 and (212) 941-3800
Fax: (212) 941-3846
Website: www.miramax.com

Content:

(BB, PPP, C, LL, VVV, M) Strong, very patriotic moral worldview that increases respect for military and demonstrates their sacrifices, plus a priest helps the anti-Japanese resistance and a soldier reads the Bible; 11 obscenities, including one slang term for a body part, three strong profanities, and a recurring slur against Japanese soldiers; strong war violence includes many point-blank executions, soldiers burned alive, many men shot in battle, man flogged and hanged, burned corpses, and minor torture; and, people steal from Japanese troops to help captured American soldiers, and the Japanese army treats its prisoners of war cruelly.

Summary:

THE GREAT RAID is a realistic, inspiring and patriotic portrayal of the most successful rescue mission in U.S. military history, where a squad of Rangers goes on a mission to extract a group of 500 American POWs during World War II. The movie’s violence is intense and sometimes graphic, however, as the Japanese soldiers perform executions at point-blank range and other cruel acts.

Review:

THE GREAT RAID is a realistic, harrowing portrayal of the most successful rescue mission in U.S. military history. It is about a group of 500 American POWs during World War II and the squad of Rangers that extracted them. The movie extends its eye to the Filipino underground, which sneaks help to the American POWs, and the cruel Japanese government trying to crush them all.

Morale is waning at the POW camp. They have been stranded there for three years and are losing any hope for a rescue. Unknown to the American soldiers, the Japanese are sending in their most ruthless commander to torture and finally kill the POWs.

American forces get wind of their soldiers’ potential demise and send in the Rangers. Lt. Col. Henry Mussi, played by LAW & ORDER alum Benjamin Bratt, plans his attack carefully. His mission – sneaking into a camp armed with several hundred enemy soldiers – seems nearly impossible, especially when you’re leading unpracticed men, as he was.

[Warning – Spoiler] Lt. Mussi and his men overcome the odds and complete a dazzling raid on the POW camp. Their victory is inspiring not only as a reminder of what a team can accomplish, but also of the bravery and fearlessness of those serving in the armed forces.

The American soldiers act morally and value life. One fearful soldier reads his Bible and gives a card with the Virgin Mary on it to another soldier who doesn’t know God.

The movie’s violence is intense and sometimes graphic. Japanese soldiers perform executions at point-blank range, and they perform other cruel acts like burning men alive and hanging their prisoners. The handful of obscenities is mild for a war movie, especially in light of what was probably said in real life, but the three profanities are stronger. There is no sex or nudity.

THE GREAT RAID is an engaging celebration of the brave men who risk their lives to defend America. It’s recommended, with caution about the violence.

In Brief:

THE GREAT RAID is a realistic, harrowing portrayal of the most successful rescue mission in U.S. military history. It is about a group of 500 American POWs during World War II and the squad of Rangers attempting to extract them. The movie extends its eye to the Filipino underground, which sneaks help to the American POWs, and the cruel Japanese government trying to crush them all. After three years, the Japanese are sending their most ruthless commander to kill the POWs. American forces send in the Rangers as a last resort. Their mission – sneaking into a camp armed with several hundred enemy soldiers – seems nearly impossible, especially with unpracticed soldiers, but they overcome the odds and complete a dazzling raid on the POW camp.

THE GREAT RAID is an inspiring, patriotic reminder of the bravery and fearlessness of our armed forces. The movie’s violence, however, is intense and sometimes graphic. Japanese soldiers perform executions at point-blank range and other cruel acts like burning men alive. The handful of obscenities is mild but the three profanities are stronger. THE GREAT RAID is an engaging celebration of the brave men who risk their lives to defend America.