THE LAST SEPTEMBER

Perplexing Portrait

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 21, 2000

Starring: Maggie Smith, Keeley Hawes,
David Tennant, Gary Lydon,
Fiona Shaw, & Michael Gambon

Genre: Historical Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 103 minutes

Distributor: Trimark Pictures

Director: Deborah Warner

Executive Producer: Peter Fudakowski, Neil Jordan,
Nik Powell, & Stephan Woolley

Producer: Yvonne Thunder

Writer: Elizabeth Bowen & John
Banville

Address Comments To:

Mark Amin, CEO
Trimark Pictures
2644 30th Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405
Phone: (310) 314-2000
Fax: (310) 396-6041
Email: trimark@trimarkpictures.com

Content:

(FeFe, L, VV, SS, NN, A, D, M) Feminist worldview with moral ambiguity; 2 mild obscenities, 2 mild profanities, 1 strong profanity, & soldier urinates on storefront’s threshold to indicate contempt for the store owner’s ethnicity; two men shot & attempted rape; rear male nudity when soldier is kidnapped & upper female nudity in scene that leads to attempted rape; alcohol use; smoking; and, lying.

Summary:

THE LAST SEPTEMBER is a perplexing, ultimately frustrating, portrait of a young woman in 1920s Ireland who can’t decide between a dashing English officer and the Irish rebel. Despite some interesting atmosphere and fine acting, THE LAST SEPTEMBER seems to be some kind of a cryptic feminist work that is too ambiguous for its own good.

Review:

THE LAST SEPTEMBER is a perplexing, ultimately frustrating, portrait of a young woman in 1920s Ireland who can’t decide between a dashing English officer and the Irish rebel with whom she grew up as a child. Keeley Hawes plays the indecisive lady, Lois, who has been orphaned and is now the ward of her kindly, rich uncle. She and her guardian are part of the aristocratic “Anglo Irish” who collaborate with the English soldiers trying to stamp out the Irish rebellion. Lois starts protecting an Irish rebel, whom the English soldiers are now desperately trying to catch. Her indecision unintentionally leads to tragedy, however.

The problem with THE LAST SEPTEMBER is that Lois’s relationship with the Irish rebel never quite makes sense. Not only is he clearly not as dashing as the British officer, but Lois spurns his physical attentions after teasing the man, who eventually tries to rape her. Thus, THE LAST SEPTEMBER seems to be some kind of a cryptic feminist work that is too ambiguous for its own good. Finally, although the movie provides an interesting look at an important point in England and Ireland’s modern history, it includes some strong sexual content and nudity.

In Brief:

THE LAST SEPTEMBER is a perplexing, frustrating portrait of a young woman in 1920s Ireland who can’t decide between a dashing English officer and the Irish rebel with whom she grew up as a child. Keeley Hawes plays the indecisive lady, Lois, who has been orphaned and is now the ward of her kindly, rich uncle. She and her guardian are part of the aristocratic “Anglo Irish” who collaborate with the English soldiers trying to stamp out the Irish rebellion. Lois starts protecting an Irish rebel, whom the English soldiers are now desperately trying to catch. Her indecision unintentionally leads to tragedy, however.

The problem with THE LAST SEPTEMBER is that Lois’s relationship with the Irish rebel never makes sense. Not only is he clearly not as dashing as the British officer, but Lois spurns his physical attentions after teasing the man, who eventually tries to rape her. Thus, THE LAST SEPTEMBER seems to be some kind of a cryptic feminist work that is too ambiguous for its own good. Although the movie provides an interesting look at an important point in England and Ireland’s modern history, it includes some strong sexual content and nudity