THE LEGEND OF DRUNKEN MASTER Add To My Top 10

Armed with Alcohol

Content -2
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 20, 2000

Starring: Jackie Chan, Lung Ti, Chin Kar Lok, Ken Lo, & Anita Mui

Genre: Comedy/Action-Adventure/Martial
Arts

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 138 minutes

Distributor:

Director: Chia-Liang Liu

Executive Producer:

Producer: Barbie Tung

Writer: King-Sang Tseng & Kai-Chi Yun

Address Comments To:

Bob & Harvey Weinstein
Miramax Films
Tribeca Film Center
375 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10013-2338
(212) 941-3800

Content:

(PaPa, Ro, B, LL, VVV, N, AAA, MM) Pagan worldview including ancestor worship with some moral & romantic elements of man trying to save country from losing its cultural heritage; at least 7 obscenities & 4 profanities including exclamations of, “God” & use of g…d…; strong action violence depicting martial arts fighting & bullying with some use of weapons such as man uses spear against man with sword but no injuries, man impaled with staff, man strikes woman, father beats son repeatedly then disowns him, father forces son to drink by pouring liquid down his throat, man hung by arms, man thrown against hot wall, woman trips & falls, gang with hatchets attacks two men, man dropped against beam, man hits & stabs other men with weapon made of bamboo, depicted man’s death though done for comedy, man shoots other man, depicted blood, imprisoned men are beaten, man falls on bed of coals, & men catch on fire; no sex; upper male nudity & man hung from arms with only a wide banner covering private area; alcohol use & abuse which is rebuked, but depicted as a fighting aid; and, other questionable elements such as man grabs chest as reference to nursing, theft & lying.

Summary:

Made in 1994, THE LEGEND OF DRUNKEN MASTER is another dubbed Jackie Chan movie with his many creative, yet violent fight scenes. It also carries some tense family scenes that vary from the usual upbeat, comic tone of his other movies. Because of this and the use of liquor that may be appealing to teenagers, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution.

Review:

Made in 1994, THE LEGEND OF DRUNKEN MASTER is another dubbed Jackie Chan movie whose name alone will sell tickets. Though the choreography of some of the fight scenes is extremely creative, the usual upbeat, comic tone has a few out-of-place tense family scenes that make the plot even more obscure.

Wong Fei-Hong is traveling with his father, a type of herbal doctor, and brother via railroad after purchasing some Ginseng in its root form. Since all travelers must pay taxes on their purchases, Fei-Hong decides to sneak his package in with some wealthy British travelers who don’t have to pay custom duties. The train stops, leaving Fei-Hong with the perfect opportunity to sneak into the upper-class car of the train to retrieve his package. To his surprise, a man stealing a similar package strikes him, and after he grabs what he thinks is his package, he runs after him. The two men fight, and though Fei-Hong is younger, the other man is quite good himself. They continue to fight until Fei-Hong hears the train whistle, and quickly runs on board.

Later, Fei-Hong realizes that he has the wrong package, and that he actually possesses a Jade Seal of the Emperor. Back on the train, a group of officers start trouble and accuse Fei-Hong of having the stolen piece. Fortunately, a man on the train who is also a member of the government stops the dispute. However, Fei-Hong’s troubles only continue once he arrives home and his father asks for the Ginseng. His stepmother, wanting to protect Fei-Hong, uses a root from a bonsai tree instead, to give to the patient who asked for it.

The group on the train has now followed Fei-Hong to his hometown and come after him. Fei-Hong fights them and begins using the “drunken boxing technique.” The idea is that with some alcohol in his system, the fighter has more adrenaline for strength and is more limber, also his pain tolerance is also increased. His stepmother throws him bottle after bottle of liquor when he is under attack, and he drinks them in-between punches. He wins the fight, but when his father sees how drunk he is, he takes him home and beats him. When his father finds out the root given to the ailing patient was actually from his prize bonsai, he disowns him. This later brings remorse to Fei-Hong, who vows not to participate in drunken boxing anymore and regains his father’s acceptance. However, when the British upper-class thieves begin taking cultural souvenirs, Fei-Hong must decide to let them get away with it, or defend his country.

THE LEGEND OF DRUNKEN MASTER is another in a series of dubbed Jackie Chan movies that are actually spoofs of martial arts movies in general. Though the characters may seem a stretch from many stereotypical comic male and especially female roles, the comedy is more on the silly side, rather than a great script. However, this movie differed from others by Chan in that there were some scenes that were quite serious, if not intense, making the plot uneven in its flow.

Regrettably, this movie contains a high amount of martial arts violence, and though it is not highly graphic, it is highly imitative and full of implied injury. The depicted drinking was also done in a manner that was rough, often showing Chan gulping down the presumed alcohol at a rapid rate. Although his father rebukes his drunkenness, his character seems to merely learn to have the right balance of drunkenness for “drunken boxing” and is shown strengthened by the alcohol. This element, like the fighting, can be highly imitative, and parents should be extremely cautious about letting their children see DRUNKEN MASTER.

In Brief:

THE LEGEND OF DRUNKEN MASTER is another in a series of dubbed Jackie Chan movies that are actually spoofs of martial arts movies in general. Chan, whose name alone will sell tickets, does not disappoint with many well-choreographed and creative fight scenes. He plays the son of a herbal doctor who uncovers a plot by the British ambassador to steal Chinese cultural artifacts. Against his father’s wishes, Chan’s character uses the “drunken boxing” martial arts technique to defeat his foes, a technique where the fighter drinks gobs of alcohol to make his body limber and increase his pain threshold.

Regrettably, this movie contains a high amount of martial arts violence, and, although it is not highly graphic, it is highly imitative and full of implied injury. The depicted drinking was also done in a manner that was rough, often showing Chan gulping down the presumed alcohol at a rapid rate. Although his father rebukes his drunkenness, his character seems to merely learn to have the right balance of drunkenness for "drunken boxing," and is shown strengthened by the alcohol. This element, like the fighting, can be highly imitative, so parents should be extremely cautious