THE PEREZ FAMILY

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 12, 1995

Starring: Marisa Tomei, Alfred Molina,
Anjelica Huston, Chazz
Palminteri, Trini Alvarado,
Celia Cruz, & Diego Wallraff

Genre: Comic Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 112 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Company

Director: Mira Nair EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS:
Julia Chasman & Robin Swicord

Executive Producer:

Producer: Julia Chasman & Robin
Swicord PRODUCERS: Michael
Nozik & Lydia Dean Pilcher

Writer: Robin Swicord BASED ON THE
NOVEL BY: Christine Bell

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, L, V, SS, NN, M) Moral worldview; 7 obscenities, 1 profanity & 6 vulgarities; brief violence -- man gets shot; depicted adultery & immorality; naturalistic male nudity & brief female nudity; and, car theft.

Summary:

THE PEREZ FAMILY tells its story of love, separation and reunion in flashback from Cuba to 20 years later in the city of Miami. While the movie contains some offensive content -- brief nudity and sexual immorality -- the end of THE PEREZ FAMILY is a morally welcome, though frustrating, one. The mixture of romance, comedy and drama results in a messy picture.

Review:

THE PEREZ FAMILY tells its story of love, separation and reunion in flashback from Cuba to 20 years later in the city of Miami. Refusing to give in to Fidel Castro's Communist takeover in the 60s, Juan Raul Perez is imprisoned. Thankfully, he first sends his wife, Carmela, and three-year-old daughter on a permanent "vacation," hoping to find them some time in the future. It is this hope that sustains him. Dottie Perez, no relation to Juan, is a spunky prostitute set on meeting Elvis Presley and finding a new life in the USA. Both end up on the last boat of refugees allowed out of Cuba. A misunderstanding registers the two unrelated Perezes as Mr. and Mrs. Will Raul now find his real family or be forced to live a lie in his new country?

Love and facing reality are the major themes: Dottie realizing that the United States is not the dreamland she imagined; and Raul searching diligently for his wife. Heavy accents make the dialogue difficult to understand at times, but the actors turn in decent performances. While the movie contains some offensive content -- brief nudity and sexual immorality -- the end is a morally welcome, though frustrating, one. The mixture of romance, comedy and drama results in a messy picture.

In Brief: