THE RELIC

Monster Movie Re-visited

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1997

Starring: Penelope Ann Miller, Tom
Sizemore, Linda Hunt, & James
Whitmore

Genre: Horror

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Director: Peter Hyams

Executive Producer: Gary Levinsohn & Mark Gordon

Producer: Producer Sam Mercer also
produced CONGO for Paramount.
CONGO turned out to be a
sleeper hit, and it had many
of the same thematic and
stylistic elements as THE
RELIC. Mercer must have seen
this as a winning formula and
simply recreated it in a
museum. INDEPENDANCE DAY
brought in a huge audience by
revisiting the alien invasion
movie. THE RELIC, as a
facsimile of the mutant
monster movie, may not have as
much success. It is rated R,
which will eliminate a large
audience. Unlike CONGO, it is
not in good position to become
a sleeper hit.

Writer: Amy Holden Jones, John Faffo,
Rick Jaffa, & Amanda Silver

Address Comments To:

Sherry Lansing, Chairman, Motion Pictures Group
Paramount Pictures
a Paramount Communications Company
5555 Melrose Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90038
(213) 956-5000

Content:

(Pa, FR, LLL, VVV, N, A, D) Pagan, evolutionary worldview with superstitious magical elements; 34 obscenities & 15 profanities; gross violence including decapitation, images of decapitated corpses, images of decaying corpses, shooting, explosions, impaling, & many bloody attacks by monster against man; brief image of woman in underwear & obscure natural male nudity of Indians dancing around a fire; alcohol use; and, marijuana smoking & cigarette smoking

Summary:

THE RELIC revisits the monster-movie premise of old and lets a computer-generated lizard-like creature into the Natural History Museum of Chicago. The entire premise of THE RELIC comes from a godless, evolutionary worldview. THE RELIC is nothing more than a grisly popcorn movie.

Review:

In some monster movies of old, the film makers superimposed an image of a lizard on top of an image of a city street filled with screaming, hysterical people. We were told that somehow a harmless lizard mutated into a gigantic, ferocious beast, and that it must now be stopped, usually by fire or freezing it. The more things change, the more they stay the same. THE RELIC revisits this tired storyline and lets a computer-generated lizard-like creature into the Natural History Museum of Chicago. Naturally, the museum has screaming, hysterical people.

One of the potential victims is Dr. Margo Green (Penelope Ann Miller). She works at the museum and is an evolutionary biologist who assumes that there could be former species that quickly evolved and represent missing links between different classes and orders. One day, Dr. Green receives a shipment of crates that contain leaves with a special fungus containing all sorts of animal hormones. Concurrently, the director of the museum, Dr. Ann Cuthbert (Linda Hunt) is planning a special fund-raising reception for a new exhibit entitled “Superstition.” Planning to attend the event are the mayor of Chicago and well-heeled supporters of the arts and humanities.

A day before the event, a security guard gets brutally murdered. He is decapitated and his hypothalamus is removed. Dr. Cuthbert is concerned that the fund-raiser will not occur. Lieutenant Vincent D’Agosta (Tom Sizemore ) arrives at the scene to investigate. He wants the whole museum swept to find the brutal killer. He insists that if the killer is not apprehended, then the event should be postponed. The mayor calls and insists the party go on as scheduled, a certain recipe for terror.

The killer isn’t found, and Dr. Green discovers a small, but gruesome creature among the leaves that has lizard, spider and even human DNA elements. She also discovers that the creature needs to have a chemical found in the human hypothalamus. She contacts D’Agosta , and together they team up to find an agile monster that has struck again. The party goes off as planned, contained in a small part of the museum, but monsters know no boundaries and the body count mounts. Dr. Green and D’Agosta try to figure out how to stop the savage beast, while the mayor and various humbled dignitaries try to escape a museum that has been locked by an automatic security system.

This completely derivative movie borrows from THE MUMMY, JURASSIC PARK, ALIEN, and more. It has no originality and no real surprises, but it does jump through the monster-movie hoops with technical precision. The panicked people, the screamers, the runners, and the monster picking up the victim in its mouth are all demonstrated.

Producer Sam Mercer also produced CONGO for Paramount. CONGO turned out to be a sleeper hit, and it had many of the same thematic and stylistic elements as THE RELIC. Mercer must have seen this as a winning formula and simply recreated it in a museum. INDEPENDANCE DAY brought in a huge audience by revisiting the alien invasion movie. THE RELIC, as a facsimile of the mutant monster movie, may not have as much success. It is rated R, which will eliminate a large audience. Unlike CONGO, it is not in good position to become a sleeper hit.

The entire premise of THE RELIC comes from a godless, evolutionist worldview. Evolution, of course, says that slowly, over millions of years, simple organisms evolved into more complex creatures, including man. The Bible says that man and the animals were all specific acts of creation. A scientific premise of this movie states that a virus can introduce genetic material into human DNA which produces a hormone that can produce dramatic physical changes. Hence, the belief is that through time, strange creatures suddenly appeared outside of the evolutionist theory’s accepted progression of species formation.

Older teenage boys will want to bring their girlfriends to this movie because there are many scenes of shock and horror -- some of it is very sickening. We see blood, severed heads and rotting flesh. THE RELIC is nothing more than a grisly popcorn movie for the movie crowd who are bored with the high-brow movies of this winter.

In Brief:

THE RELIC revisits the monster-movie premise of old and lets a computer-generated lizard-like creature into the Natural History Museum of Chicago. Naturally, the movie has screaming, hysterical people. One would-be victim is Dr. Margo Green, an evolutionary biologist who assumes that there could be former species that quickly evolved. Director of the museum, Dr. Ann Cuthbert is planning a special fund-raising reception for a new exhibit entitled Superstition. A day before the event, a security guard gets brutally murdered. The event is held as scheduled, but Lieutenant Vincent D’Agosta enters onto the scene to find the brutal killer. Soon, Dr. Green and D’Agosta figure out how to stop the savage killer, while dignitaries try to escape a museum that has been locked by an automatic security system.

This completely derivative movie borrows from THE MUMMY, JURASSIC PARK and ALIEN. It has no originality and no real surprises, but it does jump through the monster-movie hoops with technical precision. It is rated R, which will eliminate a large audience. The entire premise of THE RELIC comes from a godless, evolutionary worldview. We also see blood, severed heads and rotting flesh. THE RELIC is nothing more than a grisly popcorn movie for that crowd who is bored with the high-brow movies of this winter.