THE RUN OF THE COUNTRY

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Albert Finney, Matt Kesslar &
Victoria Smurfit

Genre: Drama/Romance

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 110 minutes

Distributor: Castle Rock

Director: Peter Yates

Executive Producer:

Producer: Peter Yates & Ruth Boswell

Writer: Shane Connaughton

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, Ab, LLL, VV, SS, NN, M) Biblical worldview with some anti-Christian elements; 7 profanities, 8 obscenities & 23 vulgarities (Irish slang); moderate violence including bar-room brawl, decapitation, accidental death by drowning, explosion, cock-fight, beating, & tar & feathering; upper female nudity & obscured frontal male nudity; depicted act of fornication; miscarriage, and, some pro-abortion talk.

Summary:

In THE RUN OF THE COUNTRY, when 18-year-old Danny's mother dies, Danny runs away and joins an older, wilder Prunty. Freedom has its price for Danny, and he learns hard lessons that life and death teach. Thus, the message that immorality and reckless abandon can lead to painful consequences comes out loud and clear. Regrettably, the Catholic priest is depicted as peevish and mean-spirited, and the movie contains moderate violence, upper female nudity and depicted fornication.

Review:

In THE RUN OF THE COUNTRY, when 18-year-old Danny's mother dies leaving him and his father to fend for themselves, Danny finds himself at a crossroads. Originally, to attend the university, Danny's plans are put on hold because his father wants him to stay at home in County Caven, Ireland, doing the cooking and cleaning. Frustrated, Danny rebels and runs away. He joins an older, wilder Prunty. Freedom has its price for Danny, and he learns hard lessons that life and death teach. Falling in love and accepting lost loved ones do more to help him find himself than running away.

The Irish cast and countryside of THE RUN OF THE COUNTRY gives a beautiful richness and sincerity to this coming-of-age film. Yet, the characters, costumes and setting also create a distance between the viewer and the themes. The message that immorality and reckless abandon can lead to painful consequences comes out loud and clear. However, Christianity is not seen as the answer, and the Catholic priest is depicted as peevish and mean-spirited. The stand-out performances in this film are Albert Finney's portrayal of Danny's stern, an honest and loving father, and Anthony Brophy as Danny's mentor, Prunty. Overshadowing their performances is the Irishness of the film -- beautiful, real and at conflict with itself.

In Brief: