TIM BURTON'S CORPSE BRIDE

Occult, Anti-Biblical Romance with a Corpse

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 16, 2005

Starring: Johnny Depp, Helena Bonham
Carter, Emily Watson, Tracey
Ullman, and Paul Whitehouse

Genre: Animated Musical
Comedy/Fantasy

Audience: General

Rating: PG for some scary images and
action, and brief mild
language

Runtime: 73 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros.

Director: Tim Burton and Mike Johnson

Executive Producer: Jeffrey Auerbach and Joe Ranft

Producer: Allison Abbate and Tim Burton

Writer: John August and Pamela Pettler

Address Comments To:

Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO
Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, OO, RoRo, AbAbAb, FRFR, L, VV, M) Very strong, mixed pagan worldview with strong occult content where dead beings walk the earth, and spells are conducted, and strong Romantic elements that firmly state limited, earthly life is better than eternal life, as well as very strong anti-biblical message with a mean priest, plus the movie rejects belief in a clearly defined heaven or hell and instead depicts a netherworld to which everyone peacefully retires, which is a form of universalism, a false theological doctrine; one minor obscenity; occasionally unsettling or violent imagery includes reanimated corpse coming out of ground, skeletons twist each other’s heads, reanimated corpse can split in half, maggot comes out of reanimated corpse’s eye socket, a swordfight, and man accidentally drinks poison; drinking; and, parents arrange their children’s marriages for money or social status, and man attempts to marry woman for money but is foiled.

Summary:

TIM BURTON'S CORPSE BRIDE is a claymation animated comedy about a young groom who is swept into an occult netherworld, where a dead woman tries to stop him from returning to his intended bride. CORPSE BRIDE affirms some misconceptions about religion, and its fascination with the occult makes it dangerously inappropriate for young audiences, and mature viewers will be put off by its Romantic, pagan outlook that values earthly life over eternal life.

Review:

Were it not for a bizarre worldview that excludes the Christian concept of afterlife and our purpose on earth, TIM BURTON'S CORPSE BRIDE might be a charming animated comedy. The philosophy is wrongheaded and the story is somewhat weak, but the visual creativity on display is outstanding.

Set in a stylized version of Victorian England, CORPSE BRIDE begins with the meeting of Victor Van Dort and Victoria Everglot, whose marriage has been arranged by their parents. After a humiliation at the wedding rehearsal, Victor goes walking in the woods to practice his vows. When Victor playfully slips Victoria’s ring onto a tree branch and says his “I do,” the ground begins to shake and the titular character emerges. Since death, she has been waiting in a netherworld for someone to finally marry her.

Victor is frightened by the Corpse Bride, especially when she takes him back to her home for the dead. He witnesses a cabaret act put on by skeletons and reunites with his long dead dog, who is just a yipping skeleton. Victor wants to go back to earth, especially to Victoria who he genuinely wants to marry, but his eager new bride is afraid to let him out of her sight.

The situation gets stickier when Victor finds out that, after he has been missing for only a day, Victoria’s parents have already found someone else for her to marry. Both Victor and the Corpse Bride develop plans to get what they want. Will Victor remain with the dead, or will he escape back to the living?

The movie has a playful tone, despite its cast of corpses with occasional patches of missing flesh. It sports a fascination with the otherworldly and occult while maintaining a childishness, which makes it dangerously inappropriate for young audiences. Mature viewers, on the other hand, will notice that the movie is subversive, with its Romantic outlook that values limited earthly life over eternal life – quite contrary to the Christian truth, which says that we have a perfect resurrected eternal life awaiting us. Furthermore, the movie rejects belief in a clearly defined heaven or hell and instead depicts a netherworld to which everyone peacefully retires. This is a form of universalism, which is a false theological doctrine.

Finally, the Christian priest in the movie is scary and mean. Greedy ministers, unkind priests and villainous nuns begin the unfair cultural stereotypes that many children learn from many entertainment products and then, regrettably, accept throughout life. Thus, CORPSE BRIDE ultimately has a very strong, mixed pagan worldview that often contradicts the Christian, biblical worldview.

Although very creative and frequently funny, TIM BURTON'S CORPSE BRIDE is too unsavory to recommend. Christian audiences should resist the movie’s fascination with unbiblical beliefs and the occult.

In Brief:

TIM BURTON'S CORPSE BRIDE affirms misconceptions about religion that many children often learn from entertainment. Set in a stylized version of Victorian England, the action begins with Victor goes walking in the woods to practice his wedding vows. As he playfully slips his fiancée’s ring onto a tree branch and says “I do,” the ground begins to shake and the Corpse Bride emerges. Since death, she has been waiting in a netherworld for someone to marry her. Victor is plunged into a netherworld full of dancing skeletons and cheering corpses. He wants to go back to earth to marry his fiancée, but the Corpse Bride is afraid to let him out of her sight.

Were it not for a bizarre worldview that excludes heaven and a godly purpose for life, CORPSE BRIDE might be a charming, clever animated comedy. For example, the movie sports a fascination with the occult while maintaining a childish, witty tone, which makes it dangerously inappropriate for children. Mature viewers, on the other hand, will notice its subversive nature and outlook that values earthly life over eternal life. Although very creative and frequently funny, CORPSE BRIDE is too unsavory to recommend.