DIGGING FOR FIRE

"Slow, Low Key Character Comedy"

Quality:
Content: -3 Excessive content and/or worldview problems.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

DIGGING FOR FIRE is a low-key comedy. Tim and Lee are a married couple with a three-year-old child and stuck in a rut. They housesit a huge country house, where Tim stumbles across an antique gun and a human arm in the woods behind the house. Tim wants to keep digging and find out what happened, but Lee implores him to leave it alone. When she goes away for the weekend to visit her parents with their child, Tim has a party with friends and decides to dig further in the area where he found the gun and arm. Both Tim and Lee are tempted to cheat, but happily return to one another without succumbing.

DIGGING FOR FIRE is entertaining watching the impressive cast having fun with their characters. However, the pacing is too slow, and the wild behavior at the party is problematic. DIGGING FOR FIRE is really an exploration of how to stay committed to your spouse and keep a marriage alive, but the movie itself doesn’t feel that fresh. Media-wise moviegoers will want to keep digging for better entertainment.

Content:

(RoRoRo, PaPa, B, LLL, V, S, NNN, AA, DD, MM) Very strong Romantic worldview with strong pagan elements that resolves itself in a moral fashion that spotlights the importance of not letting a marriage go stale; at least 75 obscenities (mostly “f” words) and 11 profanities; a skeleton is dug up after finding a gun; some sexual immorality includes man passionately kisses woman in her underwear after he jumps naked into a pool, married woman passionately kisses man she just met on beach but stops and returns happily to her husband, her husband almost tempted by another woman, but he never gives into that temptation; full frontal nudity during skinny dipping scene and woman in underwear; alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking, cocaine use, marijuana use mentioned; and, man breaks a promise to his wife and has a party at their house with his friends while she’s away visiting her parents with their child.

More Detail:

DIGGING FOR FIRE is a low-key character comedy with an impressive cast, about a man who discovers a human arm bone and an old gun buried in the yard of the house he and his wife are watching for the summer, and the humorous exploits that follow. DIGGING FOR FIRE has a strong Romantic worldview with strong pagan undertones and attitudes, but resolves itself in moral fashion that spotlights the importance of not letting a marriage go stale.

The movie follows married couple, Tim (Jake Johnson) and Lee (Rosemarie DeWitt), who have a three-year-old, but whose lives are stuck in a rut. They get to housesit a huge country house for a few months, and Tim stumbles across an antique gun and a human arm bone in the woods behind the house.

Tim wants to keep digging and find out what happened, but Lee implores him to leave it alone. However, when she goes away for the weekend to take their child to her parents’ house, Tim invites a few friends over and things start to get out of hand.

The movie switches between Tim’s wild weekend, where a party breaks out that includes boozing, cocaine use and local loose women, though Tim steers clear of the drug use and cheating on his wife. However, he does get emotionally involved in talking with one of the women, oversharing private information with her about his life and marriage. Meanwhile, his wife goes to a bar in her hometown due to boredom and meets a guy with whom she also shares way too much info and kisses passionately before ending the adulterous encounter.

DIGGING FOR FIRE is the latest low-key, largely improvised comedy from Director Joe Swanberg of DRINKING BUDDIES. He draws a truly impressive cast to the movie considering the low budget. It’s entertaining to see the actors having a good time in relaxed roles, but the pacing is too slow much of the time, and the wild behavior in the party scenes is problematic for discerning media-wise viewers.

While DIGGING FOR FIRE is really an exploration of how to stay committed to your spouse and keep a marriage from going stale, the movie itself doesn’t feel that fresh. Media-wise moviegoers would be advised to wait for better, more uplifting entertainment without so much foul language and other questionable behavior.

Want more content like this? Make a donation to Movieguide®