MAX STEEL

"Sci-Fi Series Wannabe"

Quality:
Content: -1 Discretion advised for older children.

Rent or Buy:

NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

In MAX STEEL, a science fiction adventure, Max’s mother brings him back to a community where his father died in a mysterious accident. They had moved a number of times, as if running from something. Max discovers he has mysterious energy coming out of his hands. His mother insists she’ll tell him more when he’s older. Max’s powers seem to grow as mysterious storms appear and strange events occur. During one harrowing storm, Max meets and befriends Steel, an alien robot that understands Max’s powers and seeks to protect him from danger while helping him save the world.

MAX STEEL clearly wants to start a family-friendly science fiction franchise. It has many elements of popular science fiction movies, but fails to be convincing or satisfying. To its credit, there’s only one relatively light obscenity and no crude content. However, for a movie this ambitious, MAX STEEL has some poor cinematography. Too much of the movie just seems unrealistic or silly. Also, despite a heroic theme of good versus evil, the story of MAX STEEL lags in places and seems corny in others.

Content:

(C, B, L, V, N, M) A light redemptive, moral worldview to the extent it’s shown to be heroic to risk your life to defend others from evil, but no obvious positive or negative references to God, and there are good and bad people and good and bad aliens and implied mating between aliens and humans; one “d” obscenity; boy on a bicycle hit by a car, but not seriously injured, big storms may frighten young children, people shot at, one big fight scene; no sex but one kiss; upper male nudity; no alcohol; no smoking or drug use; and, mother withholds important information from her son, villain is deceitful and dishonest, and very brief school bullying.

More Detail:

MAX STEEL is an attempt at a science fiction series start-up that simply misfired. It’s clean and has some heroic elements, but just fails to connect.

MAX STEEL opens with Max’s mother bringing him back to a community where his father had died in a mysterious accident. They had moved a number of times previously, as if running from something.

Riding his bicycle, Max is accidentally hit by Sofia, an attractive girl from his high school. He’s not seriously injured, but Sofia repairs he damaged bicycle, and they become friends. Max discovers he has mysterious energy and particles coming out of his hands. His mother insists she will tell him more about his father when he’s older and can understand.

Max’s powers seem to grow even as mysterious storms appear in the area and strange events occur at a nearby corporation involved in energy research. In the midst of a harrowing storm, Max meets and befriends Steel, an alien robot that understands Max’s powers and seeks to protect him from danger.

In the course of the story, Max learns what happened to his father and how he’s uniquely gifted to help save the planet from evil intergalactic forces. Max and Steel actually suit up together to become something of a superhero, thus MAX STEEL.

This movie has many of the elements of very popular science fiction, but fails to be convincing or satisfying. It’s simply not logical that Max’s mother would withhold as much as she does from Max. Most viewers will know the big reveal is coming but it gets annoying when it’s delayed too long. Luke Skywalker learned fairly early that he was gifted with “the force” in STAR WARS.

To the filmmakers’ credit, there is only one relatively light obscenity, but with a movie this ambitious, some of the cinematography is poor. Many scenes are unnecessarily dark and flat. Too much of the world created just seems unrealistic or even silly. The genius of STAR WARS was that with many of the same elements as MAX STEEL they created a believable world perfectly composed in a very satisfying story. Of course, elements don’t make great science fiction, a great story does.

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