POWER RANGERS

"Nothing New Here"

Quality: Content: -2 "EXTREME CAUTION"
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

Content:

(BB, C, PC, Ho, Ev, LL, VV, S, N, A, M) Strong moral worldview with light Christian, redemptive elements stresses sacrifice, teamwork, friendship, and becoming more responsible as teenage protagonists transition into becoming heroes, a character says “Thank God,” a brief shot of nuns in a van singing “Go tell it on the mountain,” plus a politically correct homosexual element where movie implies one of the characters is struggling with figuring out her sexuality, and it’s implied she’s a lesbian, as well as a reference to 60 million years; nine obscenities (including two “s” words), two almost obscenities (a character begins to say an “f” word), nine light profanities, and a few vulgar references; lots of action violence includes a scary alien who kills a few people and tries to destroy a town with a giant gold creature, lots of punching, kicking and shooting (though little blood), human characters fight among each other and throw some punches, three very intense car crashes; light sexual immorality in one scene implying that one main female character has lesbian homosexual tendencies, plus a guy character makes some passes at girls and flirts; upper male nudity, girl strips to her underwear briefly for a swim and villain wears a somewhat revealing outfit; a reference to beer drinking; no smoking or drug use; and, bullying, but not condoned.

Summary:

POWER RANGERS is a science fiction adventure about five teenagers who are strangers to each other but are chosen to become superheroes to defend Planet Earth from an impending threat. POWER RANGERS is good, up until the point when the characters become Power Rangers, where the movie becomes too cheesy. MOVEGUIDE® advises strong caution for a politically correct homosexual element, some foul language and action violence.

Review:

POWER RANGERS is a science-fiction adventure reboot based on the television series that debuted in America in the 1990s and created a new franchise of entertainment and merchandising. This reboot is surprisingly entertaining, though it contains some issues and falters in the final act.
Jason Scott is a high school football player whose life seems over when he injures himself in a car accident while fleeing from police. James is placed on probation and into detention for the rest of the year. In detention, he meets a few other outcasts, including Billy, an autistic teen with an affinity for technology, and Kimberly, a girl struggling with depression when her friends ruthlessly abandon her.
Billy convinces Jason to drive him to a gold mine just outside their small town of Angel Grove, where Billy wants to do some experiments. While out by the mine, Jason runs into Kimberly hiking through the woods. The two decide to run away from their problems in their boring lives, but are cut short when Billy causes an explosion. The explosion catches the attention of two other teenagers who are nearby, Zack, an arrogant young man, and Trini, a moody girl who doesn’t talk much. The five teenagers investigate what Billy accidentally unearthed. They find five bright stones fossilized in some crystal. The gold mine’s security begins to approach, so they each take one of the colored stones and flee together in a minivan, but it results in a horrid car crash.
Each of teenagers wake up the next morning in their respective homes, unhurt and, to their surprise, super strong. The next day they meet at the mine and explore the area where they found the stones. They discover a spaceship underground and a humorous robot. The robot, Alpha 5, introduces them to Zordon (voiced by Bryan Cranston), a former Power Ranger, who’s stuck in the Morphing Grid, which manifests itself as a talking wall. Zordon tells the five teenagers of an impending doom that threatens Earth’s existence. He reveals they’ve been chosen to become the next Power Rangers to defend all of life itself.
However, none of the teenagers wants this awesome responsibility. So, the question becomes: Can this ragtag group of youths overcome their own insecurities and inadequacies to save the day?
POWER RANGERS is a surprisingly entertaining and well-crafted movie, especially in the beginning, but falls into familiar territory once the characters officially become Power Rangers in the final act. The cast of young actors holds their own. Helping them do that is some witty dialogue and inventive cinematography. Sadly, for people who aren’t diehard POWER RANGER fans, this isn’t enough to redeem the incredibly cheesy storyline, which includes literal dino-robots, rock monsters and a villain, who’s been lying in wait for 60-some-million years.
Overall, POWER RANGERS has a strong moral worldview with some light Christian, redemptive elements. At various times, it stresses sacrifice, selflessness, teamwork, and becoming more responsible.
Director Dean Israelite recently made headlines by revealing the character of Trini will be the first lesbian character in a superhero movie. This apparently is revealed when Zack asks Trini if she’s having “boyfriend problems,” to which she says, “Yeah, boyfriend problems.” He then asks, “Girlfriend problems?” and she responds with a look, and then continues. The scene isn’t definitive at all, except for the fact that the Director wanted extra press and explained the scene. Depending on the movie’s success, the filmmakers may explore this homosexual element more in the sequels.
Because of this politically correct angle and the movie’s foul language and action violence, MOVEGUIDE® advises strong caution.

In Brief:

POWER RANGERS is a science fiction adventure based on the 1990s television series that created a franchise of entertainment and merchandising. It follows five teenagers who are strangers to each other, but are brought together when they discover five ancient stones giving them super powers. The stones lead them to a hidden spaceship with a robot and an alien. The alien tells them they’ve been chosen to become Power Rangers and must save Earth from an impending threat. Can the teenagers overcome their own insecurities and inadequacies to save the day?
POWER RANGERS is a surprisingly entertaining, well-crafted movie in the beginning, but falls into familiar territory once the characters officially become Power Rangers in the final act. Overall, POWER RANGERS has a strong moral worldview with redemptive elements stressing sacrifice, selflessness, teamwork, and taking responsibility. There’s a politically correct moment where it’s implied one of the main characters is a lesbian, or still discovering her gender, but it’s very light. Because of this politically correct element and some foul language and action violence, MOVIEGUIDE® advises strong caution for POWER RANGERS.